3 species of Bomarea

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Tom Hulse, Nov 25, 2011.

  1. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    I'm a little confused about Bomarea taxonomy, and I'm hoping you all might help some. Attached are photos of 3 species of which I have seed, but I'm not sure the names are correct. The first was labeled just Bomarea sp., and I'm hoping you have some ideas on a species (For instance what's the difference, if any, between B. petraea and B. acutifolia)
    The middle plant was labeled Bomarea caldasii. I see a lot of varying color plants labeled that on the internet, so is B. caldasii always yellow, narrow corolla, without spots?
    The last plant was labeled B. acutifolia, and again I'm curious what is the difference between acutifolia and petraea?
    I didn't see much on the net for good ID sites for Bomarea. Wikipedia is weak here, sites like IPNI have too many synonyms mixed in to makes sense, and info sites like the Pacific Bulb Society are great but have too many contradictions to be a serious source for ID. I see there was a major revisions done to the various subgenera in the last decade, but I don't have university access to the scholarly articles right now.
    Lastly, the plant which is being sold as Bomarea 'Fiesta' such as here, is really B. kalbreyeri, is that correct?
    If you can help I would sure appreciate it, many thanks!
    (P.S.- I have fresh seeds of these to trade right now. )
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Colombia

    Colombia Active Member

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    I am also confused by the differences. I have only seen two different colors of Bomarea in Colombia, photographed here http://www.latin-wife.com/Colombian-Flowers-/Bomarea-multiflora.asp
    The red one is multiflora and is very common around 2000-3000m the yellow one was photographed at around 1600 meters. I labeled this multiflora only because I did not see a difference. If this is a different species I would appreciate any suggestions.

    Does Bomarea grow in Washington?
     
  3. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Tom, I've seen a huge colour range in wild Bomarea caldasii, although the throats of the flowers are always very narrow (compared to similar species) and almost always yellow to yellow-orange. I wonder if it's a soil issue, though, because they seem to be reddest in the most acidic of the soils, and yellower in more alkaline ones. They are all alike in lacking the freckles, regardless of petal colour.

    Your first one, just off the top of my head, resembles B. setacea - any idea on the provenance of the plant? Bomarea tend to be rather specialistic, and knowing at least the country of origin will help narrow it down.

    Between B. acutifolia and B. petrea, the difference appears to come down to two things: acutifolia has slightly more lanceolate leaves than petrea, and there's a marked difference in geographical distribution. Acutifolia is from Mexico to Central America with odd specimens reported in Bolivia, and petrea is from Peru to Bolivia.

    I can't help with the 'Fiesta' vs. kalbreyeri question, but I can note that I've seen that plant in the wild, and it's just a stunner.
     
  4. Tom Hulse

    Tom Hulse Active Member 10 Years

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    Thank you both for your comments. The first one without a name came from Ecudor. The second (B. caldasii) was recorded as coming from just "South America". The last one, B. acutifolia, Mexico.
    The only picture I could find of Bomarea setacea didn't have any spots, unlike this one. Is that right?
     
  5. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    I did say "off the top of my head" - it might not be setacea, which as I now recall is freckle free. Bah. It's very difficult with Bomarea. The one in your photo, I'd bet hands down, is from the inner caldera of the Pululagua volcano, though. That's where I've seen the great bulk of the ones that look like your photo.
     

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