"acer palmatum atropurpureum" - in Perth

Discussion in 'Maples' started by FallouiFalls, Oct 26, 2007.

  1. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    For even better heat tolerance, try some of the Mediterranean maples like Acer sempervirens, A. monspessulanum, A. obtusifolium. They also have much better drought tolerance.
     
  2. FallouiFalls

    FallouiFalls Member

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    Oh, well at least you got your money back. Alas, from what I've learnt, the Acer Palmatum Atropurpureum is one of the few red-leafed maple trees that will fit into my backyard.

    I've noticed some new growths on the maple tree, even though the number of burnt leaves has increased. It's mainly the ones at the very top of the tree that are getting burnt. The majority of those at the top are crumpled looking - not burnt, but I think, I think they will be the next victims... I'm not sure though....

    The bottom leaves seem to be doing well. I know it has been said that watering the leaves should be avoided, but ironically, the ones that are being watered are those that seem healthy. Perhaps it is a coincidence, as they also happen to be the ones closer to the ground, where it is cooler or perhaps not... I wonder... Evaporation does have a cooling effect! So if it works for humans... why not for plants too?

    I found the abstract from the follwing website to be very interesting:

    http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0002-9122(193901)26:1<12:TEODOW>2.0.CO;2-P
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2007
  3. FallouiFalls

    FallouiFalls Member

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    Well, we, the residents of Perth, have seen consecutive days of 37 degrees Celsius of more. And unfortunately there are more to come.

    I initially went to Melbourne for holidays, and during this time, there was no one to water it everyday. Fortunately, we have an auto-sprinkler system which ensured it got at least two days of water per week. Poor ole maple. "It's dead!" was my first response when I came back from Melbourne, with little feet carrying me immediately to the backyard as soon as I hopped of the taxi and unloaded the luggages. Most of the leaves had fallen off, I knew, for a heap of dead, burnt leaves had gathered on the ground, dead, unwanted, long gone... The remaining leaves were crispy, curled and twisted. All hope, or so it seemed was gone...

    My second thought was, "How could I have been so foolish as to pray for a miracle. Miracles... bahhh! I'm just as foolish as the gamblers who spend all of their lives at the casinos, and then realize, on their death beds, that they had not, in actual fact, won a single cent... That they have wasted their whole lives away... rolling, and pulling, living in their little caves"

    Gathering my senses, I told myself that what has past, has past. Then one day, little little spark of hope buried in the ashes of dismay, but that existed nevertheless, burst into flame again, like oxygen being tested for by the glowing splint test. It was the day on which I decided to take a little walk around my neighbourhood. Remember the other acer pal. atro. I told you about? As I turned the corner, I could feel my eyes widening in my sockets - it was alive, it had survived. It was in far better condition than my maple tree, with a few burnt leaves here and there. But it had survived, DEFIED the merciless scorching white sun that reigns above our little desert. And so... a little smile crept across my face. A leeetle one that wavered, but it was there. Maybe... Just maybe... Was it possible that it was still alive?

    So I persevered. I watered it, day after day, for 2 mins per day at 7.00pm exactly, for regular water was important. I researched, taking care to water AROUND the trunk, to encourage the spreading of the roots. I stole some of the newly added topsoil from elsewhere in my garden and added it to my precious tree. I created a mound of mulch, heaving the bag from one end of the garden to the other. And oh! They came, they came! Sometimes in pairs, sometimes in threes, some on their own, tiny red buds began to appear. Buds which grew bigger, and bigger, and unfurled and spread until I was convinced that it was not just my imagination, until a whole branch, which had been but a bare stick before, was covered in beautiful red foliage in all their glory. And now, I'm just waiting for it to grow, taller, and wider; for the branches and the trunk to grow thicker. Waiting to see it shed its leaves to mark its first autumn, waiting for the leaves to come back. Waiting for the next summer.
     
  4. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    A story of magnamimous proportions :)
     
  5. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    oooohhh!!!! good news ,i'm happy for you and your maples...but if you return to Melbourne use automatic watering for maple! ;))
     
  6. FallouiFalls

    FallouiFalls Member

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    xD Wait till I tell you my entire life story! Kidding... Kidding... But the new growth does look more beautiful than before... and hopefully will stay that way. And hopefully, it will be more tolerant of our conditions after a year or two, once established.
     
  7. lhuget

    lhuget Active Member

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    WONDERFUL story Fallouifalls. I luv happy endings. I'm taking the plunge too with acer palmatum this year so will post from the other end of the spectrum ie. its been -40 Celsuis wind chill the last 4 days here eek! but YIPPEE! we have snow.

    Les
     
  8. FallouiFalls

    FallouiFalls Member

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    It was a good story while it lasted. Life does not stop at happy endings.

    It is now autumn and all of the leaves have become light brown at the edges - like paper. Most have fallen off. The leaves are half brown half red - the middle of it is still scarlet. Can anybody tell me if this is normal autumn behaviour?
     

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  9. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    ciao Cristine !is normal..
     
  10. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    For me (with about the same conditions as yours) is normal. You can expect this behavior during the first one-two years. It's only leaf scorch, and it's the price that we have to pay for try to grow these beauties in hot climates (Let the maple adapt to this condition, so good luck, and don't worry too much, next year will perform better) :-)

    Nelran
     
  11. Liz

    Liz Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Acers are glorious when planted in the hills such as the Blue Mts and the Dandenongs here in OZ. You should see the glorious show at the moment even if it is drought . It is the cooler softer air. Even down in the city (Melbourne) they get cooked. I should imagine Perth is way to warm. I have a pair over the front gate that are red to rust and a bright gold big leafed one off to one side. Re the browning off usually indicates hot wind damage (northerlies) here, or lack of water.

    Liz
     
  12. FallouiFalls

    FallouiFalls Member

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    Thanks everyone. Another thing that caused me some concern was that the top branches, which are now leafless, are becoming white/grey. They look quite dead...
     
  13. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Those top branches are indeed dead or dying
    It is probably normal die back. They can be broken off when totally brittle
    Hopefully your tree will now get its winter rest and return with full vigour for you in springtime (if you do indeed have seasons :))
     
  14. FallouiFalls

    FallouiFalls Member

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    That's comforting but... the majority of the branches are white at the ends - about 5 cm in. The rest of the branches are turning from a healthy red to an orangey yellowy colour. .. Is this still considered normal?
     
  15. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    ciao send a pics
     

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