Air layering Acer palmatum

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Ken Hamilton, Sep 9, 2020.

  1. 0soyoung

    0soyoung Rising Contributor

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    Rooting hormone should be totally unnecessary in air layering. I've done many air-layers with and without and find no meaningful difference in the rooting achieved.

    I've also experimented with the level of IBA applied, to as much as 4.5% IBA in a talc. In short order, it causes leaves to show fall colors, which are then even more intense when fall actually arrives. Logically, I think this should mean reduced photosynthesis and auxin production, yet I found no readily obvious effect on the adventitious rooting.

    Though somewhat aside, I'll also note that some varieties seem nearly impossible to root, my "Higasayama" is a case in point.
     
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  2. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    I'm really surprised that such a long branch could be successfully rooted bay air layering. I think I'll give it a try myself; thanks for sharing.
     
  3. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples Generous Contributor Maple Society

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    I can 100% agree with this @Osoyoung

    @Margot I cut the branch back because the roots wouldn't be able to support the whole branch (about 6 to 7 ft) at this time.

    I hope you have success on your first try!
     
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  4. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples Generous Contributor Maple Society

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    Decided to check on a few of the airlayers and this is what I found on one.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Sep 18, 2020
  5. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member 10 Years

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    Flowers?!...it's obviously felt the stress :)....it's funny how grafting etc. often results in flowers...even on trees you've never seen flowers on before.
     
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  6. opusoculi

    opusoculi Well-Known Member

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    You can also propagate A. cappadocicum by root cutting , in december with hight chances of succes.
    But Acer palmatum do not.
     
  7. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Thanks for the tip. Mine are not big enough to try but I'll bear that in mind.
     
  8. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    I should have removed the air-layer earlier, but...

    marc-acer_200919a.jpg marc-acer_200919b.jpg marc-acer_200919c.jpg marc-acer_200919d.jpg marc-acer_200919e.jpg marc-acer_200919f.jpg

    I'm the air-layer-man ;0)

    Man, is that the air-layer man?
    I think he's loosen his mind. I think he's lost his mind !

    Huh, huh, hehe, ho ho... ;0)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2020
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  9. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @AlainK amazing roots Alain and two for the price of one. Always a winner!!!
     
  10. pphdam

    pphdam Member

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    @Ken Hamilton, what is the best time of the year to air layering Acer palmatum. I am keen to try it out next year. Thanks.

    P
     
  11. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pphdam good morning P, just saw this and I know it's for Ken, but thought I would just mention it's 'Spring' to your question.
     
  12. pphdam

    pphdam Member

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    Good morning D, thanks.
    Do I need to wait for the leaves fully grown in spring before airlayer, ie in late April or early May perhaps? Also if air layering is successfully then when will it be the best time to remove from the parent tree, in autumn or the following sping? Thanks.

    P
     
  13. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @pphdam, I prefer to air layer when the leaves are formed in late April and not before. The sap is still rising but the tree has some strength. The roots should then have formed by middle to end of September the same year, enough to cut from the parent tree. But this is not a golden rule, so checking is necessary. If like Alain's example, a massive root structure has formed, it will be easily visible.
     
  14. pphdam

    pphdam Member

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    D, thanks.

    P
     
  15. 0soyoung

    0soyoung Rising Contributor

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    I prefer to girdle stems before the tree leafs out. It is so much easier to see what I'm doing as well as affect the other things involved. Nothing much happens in the way of making adventitious roots until after the new flush of foliage has hardened.

    Also, I've learned over time to just girdle the stem (dust with rooting hormone if you wish) and walk away, leaving the girdle open to the air for a day or two. It is the easiest way to assure that the xylem initials are desiccated and will not cause the girdle to bridge.
     
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  16. kgeezy20

    kgeezy20 Active Member Maple Society

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    This doesn’t hurt the part of the tree past the girdle?
     
  17. 0soyoung

    0soyoung Rising Contributor

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    No.
    In fact, it is less damaging than deeply scraping or even nibbling away the exposed wood which some people do to accomplish the same end.
     
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  18. kgeezy20

    kgeezy20 Active Member Maple Society

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    So interesting. Definitely something I want to try on more than just Acers.
     
  19. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi guys.I've layered before where you just wound the stem and plant it and understand why that works.However a lot of pics/videos I've seen of air layering seem to show removing a big ring right round the branch down to the white heartwood.How does the branch still get supported?is there another layer of active cells below the white wood?
     
  20. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    @Houzi re your question J, it is the xylem that carries the mineral nutrients and water from the roots up to the leaves. Hence why air layering can take place.
     
  21. Houzi

    Houzi Active Member 10 Years

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    Cheers D....you know what,I knew what the two systems did but always thought they were neighbouring systems both living in the outer layer.Never knew the xylem was deeper and effectively dead.That explains why it took 2years to kill a rogue sycamore.I removed 6" of bark and scraped away all signs of life and couldn't believe it when it leafed out as normal in the spring.Live&learn.
     
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  22. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Update :

    I pruned the bottom part, which is not very interesting for bonsai because of its long fat horizontal root, to the first (and only) branch. I haven't done anything with it apart watering it like the others when it was needed, but you can see it's healing quite well after only two years and no treatment at all. I'm beginning to think that I could maybe atempt something with it :

    acerp24m0_220217a.jpg

    The upper part was also left unattended. There, the big cut didn't heal as well :

    acerp24m_220217a.jpg acerp24m_220217b.jpg

    I have a plan! I decided to prune it hard. I put some cut paste on the wound this time (not on the photo). I will repot it in the coming days.

    acerp24m_220217c.jpg

    I'll post photos of the repotting, and say a few words about how I plan to design this tree.
     
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  23. LoverOfMaples

    LoverOfMaples Generous Contributor Maple Society

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    I live the movement in that top half and can't wait to see what you have planned for both.
     
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