Autumn Moon

Discussion in 'Maples' started by krautz33, Jul 14, 2005.

  1. krautz33

    krautz33 Active Member 10 Years

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    I have purchased Autumn Moon. I was going to plant this tree in full sun. I live in Pa., Will the tree burn in full sun zn 6.

    Thank you
    Mike
     
  2. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Mike,

    I just moved mine out of the full sun today as the leaf margins are pretty crispy. It is in a 3gal can and I have been keeping it moist. It dug it up this past spring and put it into the container. So there is definately some strees involved in its lack of tolerance.

    It is slightly more tolerant than Aureum, but even when I had it in the ground in almost full shade, the hot summer winds here in southern Oregon with dry the leaf margins. I recommend morning sun and indirect exposure. If you are going to plant it in the ground it will become more tolerant overtime, but it will still likely suffer some damage. It is just not a full sun plant.

    There is definately no doubt that given the right exposure it is one of the most stunning Acers! You might try putting it in a pot and digging the pot into the ground in the intended location and see how it holds up, that way you can move it without too much root trauma if things don't work out. During the trial time, the roots will be insulated.

    Good luck.
     
  3. Idacer

    Idacer Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Michael,

    First time I've ever seen this recommendation on the board. I've used it quite a bit over the last three or four years, but was never brave enough to mention it here. I figured there was probably something technically wrong with the practice since it was something that I sort of thought up one day. It seems to me that a tree in a 1-gallon planted pot will do much better than a tree in a similar pot setting above ground level.

    Mike: sorry to have stepped on your thread.

    Bryan
     
  4. mjh1676

    mjh1676 Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Bryan,

    It makes intuitive sense, but I have have only done it once or twice. Not with maples, but with conifers as I was waiting for fall to come so I could plant. What I like is I can enjoy the plant in its location at the planted height and get a feel for what it will look like.

    The insulation and decreased water requirements are just a plus. With sensitive plant that many not survive a particular location, it makes sense to minimize the trauma to the roots from digging and moving. I bet this technique is more widely used then you think. An extension of the way that a nursery might mound b&b stock in bark berms and the like.

    MJH
     
  5. Layne Uyeno

    Layne Uyeno Active Member 10 Years

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    Hi,

    It is not all that unusual. Some nurseries grow trees and shrubs by what is called pot in pot. A hole is dug in the ground, course gravel is spread on the bottom of the hole for drainage and a "pot" is inserted in the hole. Then the potted plant is placed in this pot in the ground. It's sort of a compromise between above ground container growing and growing directly in the ground.

    Layne
     
  6. Ralph Walton

    Ralph Walton Active Member 10 Years

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    This method would be a good "plan B" - when the time (season) is not right for transplanting, or the intended spot is not ready this would be preferrable to leaving the pot on the surface, and certainly better than planting and re-digging at a a later date.
    Some concerns that keep it from being a "plan A":
    -obviously a plant without a pot can spread it's roots and start to settle in. If your choice of position was right, then you're that much further ahead.
    -roots often are "reflected" or spiral along the soil/pot interface instead of branching.
    -if you just plant the *@#& thing, then you can scratch off one more line on your "to do" list.
    Wouldn't that be an improvement?

    Ralph
     
  7. jacquot

    jacquot Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    My Autumn Moon is in about 4-5 hours of morning sun and is stunning. The red/orange color lasts well into June, then it turns a good light yellow green. I really love this tree. Under these conditions, it has not burned at all. I read that the color persists longer with more sun, but perhaps with other consequences. Mine is in a container and is more horizontal in growth, but the tree was also selected for container habit. It is one of my very favorites, and has interesting fall color of red margins on yellow. It's a real beauty.
     
  8. MtnGato

    MtnGato Active Member

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    Mine still carries its color, even in mid-July! It gets sun until about 2 or 3pm, and is still in a 1-gallon pot. I love this tree!
     
  9. Idacer

    Idacer Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Ralph,

    I use the pot-in-the-ground method for my newly grafted and/or young trees in 1 to 3-gallon pots. For those that I intend to keep and weave into the landscape, I don't like to plant until they're two or three years old. Winter kill rates are too high on younger plants with immature root systems, so I pull them into a protected enclosure that stays just above freezing during the winters.

    It was 107 here a couple of days ago and potted trees can get pretty stressed, even in full shade. The ones insulated down in the ground handle it better. The roots stay cooler and evaporation rates seem to be lower.

    Bryan
     

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