Citrus growing discussion - a few questions.

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by mr.shep, Oct 31, 2004.

  1. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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    The Owari($49) will wait until next year (due to spousal restrictions!!!)
    The Nagami ($59 ?)and the Owari were in a monrovia pots. i'm not sure if it was a bush or patio variety I will check it out - maybe tomorrow. both were 2 or 3 gallon size.
    I am trying to get a avocado and try that ( Spousal approval - she likes guacomole !)
    see other thread
    Greg
     
  2. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Thanks, Greg. No need to go check. I called earlier today and was told it's a Centennial kumquat bush ($55).
     
  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Greg, did you ever check out Bob and Verna Duncan's citrus inventory? I noticed they have an interesting selection, including a number of less common hardy citrus varieties.
     
  4. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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    No I havent checked them out ...do you have some contact information for them?
    You can send me a private message if you like. I would be interested in what they have.
    When do you bring you citrus indoors?
    This has been an interesting summer for me and my plants - I wish I had started on this citrus kick sooner...
    Cheers, G.
     
  5. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    They're on the web, barely, as Fruit Trees and More. E-mail them and they'll send you a list of what's available. The following hardy citrus appears in the list:
    Dunstan Citrumello hardy grapefruit
    Ichang Papeda hardy lemon
    Khasi Papeda hardy lemon
    Kwano Natsu Daidai hardy orange
    Thomasville Citrangequat
    Yuzu Ichandarin hardy orange
    Shangjuan hardy grapefuit
    Ten Degree Tangerine​
    No help here - my citrus are always indoors
     
  6. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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    Thanks very much for the info! I have sent them a e mail and I am waiting for a reply.
    Ten degree tangerine sounds like one worth trying and maybe a hardy orange. I want
    something quite palatable (my Calamonedens are quite tart but the kids love em)
    The swweter the better. Right now I am not into making marmelade....
    Can anyone lead me in the right direction with these (or other) hardy citrus? (Zone 8a)
    Thanks, Greg
     
  7. Mikkie

    Mikkie Member

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    Re: Lemons


    Please could you say at what piont citrus trees should be producing friut? We have an orange tree that has fruit the size of walnuts and there is about 20 so far, but our lemon tree is not doing anything other than growing.

    They are both approx 35" tall by about 30" wide and are both in large ceramic pots, with ample drainage.

    Thankyou
     
  8. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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    Mikkie, this past june i bought 2 lemons myself a 1 gallon Eureka and a 2 gallon Meyor
    (the meyor is not a true lemon) My Eureka does not have fruit, but my meyor has
    6 lemons on it. Some citrus from what I understand, take untill year 3 to start producing.
    Are your lemons outside? or are they indoors?

    By the way,(anyone who is interested !) I have been in touch with McKenzie Farms in S Carolina - they produce hardy
    citrus - They can supply a Phyto sanitary certificate so us canadians CAN import his trees into canada (Although, I will be getting my citrus shipped to a parcel depot it
    Point Roberts WA and i will bring it through the border myself with the phyto certificate)
    This is one of 3 companies that provide this service to canadians for a nominal fee :

    AUTHORIZED SHIPPING OUTLET
    THE LETTER CARRIER
    145 TYEE DR
    POINT ROBERTS, WA 98281
    360-945-0515


    I was looking at a 10 degree tangerine, hardy tangerine and a hardy citrumelo.
    Here are the plant descriptions........Does anyone have thoughts on these varieties?
    Especially for our Vancouver (BC) climate?

    Here are their descriptions:

    Ten Degree Tangerine: The Ten Degree tangerine certainly lives up to its name. My tree has never been exposed to 10 F but has sailed thru a night of 13 F with flying colors. Tree is very thorny but produces good crops of tangerines with a somewhat sweet/tart flavor. The ten degree tangerine was developed in Texas and has Yuzu and some other mandarins in its bloodline.
    Sweet mandarin type citrus. Cold hardy up to a protected zone 8 climate.


    Hardy Tangerine - Cuttings from this plant also come from
    South Carolina and has survived 0 degrees and with no damage whatsoever. This definitely worth trying in a warmer/protected zone 7b climate. A sure winner in a non protected zone 8 climate!!

    Hardy Citrumelo - A hybrid citrus plant which is a cross between

    a grapefruit and a very hardy citrus relative called Poncirus Trifoliata. Poncirus trees have been planted and thrive in very cold areas up to usda zone 5. Citrumelo's are reliably hardy up to USDA zone 8a, but definitely worth trying in warmer zone 7b areas. The flavor is that of a white grapefruit
     
  9. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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  10. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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    As it turns out Mckenzie farms has to treat the plants with
    a product called Talstar. At this time Stan The Citrus Man
    regretably can't / wont go through with the expense and presumably
    the time to phyto the plants. He has been very helpful and if I were living
    stateside I would buy from him in a heartbeat.
    Has anyone in the northwest had success with these hardy citrus?
    Greg
     
  11. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    i just purchased an Ichange Lemon and a Taichange Lemon from Stan McKenzie. In fact I will be seeing Stan next month at the Southeast Citrus Expo on November 14th. in South Carolina. Stan is now growing approximately 60 different varieties of cold hardy citrus. Not all the varieties are shown on his web site. - Millet
     
  12. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Here is the latest list from the misses
    home collection. I've added to my small
    collection also in the last year as well.
    All of these below are, for the most part,
    easily obtainable around here.

    All of the Citrus below except the Encore
    are in 15 gallon containers or soon will be.

    SD = semi-dwarf, D = dwarf. Having the
    three forms of Sanguinelli was done by
    design as they should be different forms
    based on their naming from the source
    nurseries. In the olden days based on
    the names they were different, selected
    forms. We'll be more certain of what
    we have later.

    Jim

    Lemons

    Berna SD
    Femminello SD
    Femminello Ovale 'Santa Teresa' SD
    Meyer Lemon D
    Pink Variegated (Eureka) D
    Primofiore SD
    Seedless Lisbon SD

    Limes

    Bearss Seedless D
    Kaffir D
    Mexican Lime D
    Palestine Sweet Lime D

    Mandarins

    Daisy SD
    Encore SD
    Fortune SD
    Fremont D
    Gold Nugget SD
    Kinnow D
    Murcott D
    Owari Satsuma D
    Page SD
    Pixie SD
    Seedless Kishu SD
    Tahoe Gold SD
    W. Murcott (Afourer) D

    Tangor

    Ortanique SD

    Oranges

    Cara Cara Pink Navel D
    Hamlin Sweet SD
    Midknight Valencia SD
    Newhall Navel SD
    Parent Washington Navel SD
    Seedless Valencia SD
    Skaggs Bonanza SD
    Trovita SD

    Blood Oranges

    Moro SD
    Sanguinella D
    Sanguina Doble Fina SD
    Sanguinello SD
    Tarocco SD
    Tarocco #7 SD

    The above list has been updated as of 04/19/07/.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2007
  13. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Jim, your getting to be quite a collector. Tell me, do you know what the term "Fina" means in citrus varieties? I notice you have a Sanguina Double "Fina", and in my collection I have a Clementine "Fina" Sodea." - Millet
     
  14. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Fina should mean fine but how it is used is what
    is confusing such as doble fina - double fine. What
    is that supposed to mean? Then we can take fine
    one step further and realize there is a Doublefine
    Ameliorée as a name for a Blood Orange.

    The Clementina Fina Sodea came into UCR in 1987
    from Morocco and the Clementina Fina came to UCR
    in 1990 from Spain. Who else is involved with the
    naming? Why all of sudden start calling an old
    Clementine a Clementina and what is the reasoning
    behind it?

    You may have to ask someone at UC Riverside or
    if need be UC Davis and get an answer as to the
    history of the Clementina Fina Sodea.

    Look at page 47 of the link below (it is about a
    7 megabyte file to open). It seems the Sanguina
    Doble Fina was also grown in the same trials at
    Lindcove as Clementina Fina Sodea was as well
    as a couple more Clementinas, along with some
    of the Italian Lemons.

    ANR Research and Extension Centers: 2003 Annual Report

    Jim
     
  15. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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    Here is a question on propagating citrus from cuttings....
    I have allowed some suckers to grow from 'below the graft' for the purposes of
    growing my own rootstock for future expansion. Now in the last 5 to 6 weeks
    the suckers have grown to about 30 cm in length and I think it is about time to try and root them. They are trifoliate suckers although one looks like it may be the flying dragon strain. The wood is thin and thorns are soft and pliable. I have 2 types of rooting hormone a #1 for soft wood and a # 2 for semi hard wood. which type is best to use for rooting this type of citrus? What about other types ? What type of soil should I use? Any other tips on this would be appreciated.
    Thanks
    Greg
     
  16. lifespeed

    lifespeed Member

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    Jim,

    I am searching for the ideal Sanguinella blood orange tree. I had a dwarf variety in Santa Rosa, CA but it never increased in size over a period of four years despite appropriate care.

    Now I am living in the slightly warmer south San Jose area, and would like to try again. I think I would like a standard-size tree this time. Is there any particular rootstock or grower that you would recommend? I know there are many wholesale citrus nurseries in the Visalia area, but I will need to locate a retail outlet as I am only in the market for a single tree.
     
  17. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Lifespeed, I do not think you will receive a response from Jim (Mr. Shep), unfortunately Jim no longer posts on this forum. I think you can find the Sanguinella that you are looking for at Menlo Growers, 11605 New Avenue, Gilroy, (408) 683-4862. Menlo Growers have a very large selection of citrus varieties, plus many other types of fruit trees. BTW I rather like your screen name "Lifespeed." The older one gets, the truer the name becomes. - Millet
     
  18. lifespeed

    lifespeed Member

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    Millet,

    Thanks for the tip. Indeed they do have Sanguinella blood orange on standard rootstock. Apparently freeze-wounded, but still alive. What is it with the "dwarf epidemic"? So hard to find standard-size trees these days.
     
  19. Gregn

    Gregn Active Member 10 Years

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    Millet, another question for you...I had a couple of changsha manderins that I saved for Christmas harvest. Also, (all 2 fruit!!!) seemed to ripen just fine, they changed colour late september and held on the tree until Boxing Day (Dec 26) Do they need less heat than other manderins? ( I've had them in my garage from Oct 30...) They were very sweet and well worth growing. I am looking forward to a larger crop this year! I started germinating the seeds right away and they are now starting to sprout. I understand they grow true from seed - so what age could one expect to see flowers and fruit?

    Greg
     
  20. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Greg, I do not know if the Changsha requires more or less heat than other mandarins. My guess would be that it probably requires about the same amount of heat to mature the fruit. A Changsha seed (your tree must not be a Seedless Changsha) should produce fruit 4-5 years from seed germination, provided the tree's cultivation is kept up summer and winter. BTW a month or so ago, you asked me if I had a Seedless Changsha. I think (not sure) I told you that I did not have one, however, I found one in my greenhouse today. Guess I have to many varieties to keep track of all of them, or I'm getting to old to remember things. Probably the latter. Lastly, if you do not have a Fremont Mandarin, you might try to obtain one. It is a good tree and the fruit is DELICIOUS. - Millet
     
  21. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Here I was hoping that I could just do a yearly
    update of the misses mini collection (and not
    get caught) using an Edit button but I guess
    I waited too long to come back into this thread
    a year later for that to happen.

    Citrus since the last edit on 4/19/07.

    Lemons

    Corpaci SD
    Monachello SD

    Limes

    Mexican Sweet Lime D

    Oranges

    Fukumoto SD
    Pineapple Sweet SD

    Specialty

    Cocktail SD
    Indio Mandarinquat D
    Melogold SD
    Sarawak SD
     
  22. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    shep, Having 71 posting on this topic , minus your own, I feel an interest. You should carry on.
     
  23. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Is anyone else here growing Citrus in the tropics? Here's what I've got so far, but I'm afraid that my true lemon bush may succumb to a number of nasty bugs. I'll oil it next time it gets sunny, and hope for the best, I guess. I'm not entirely sure of which cultivars I've got.... They are all full-size trees, about 3-5 years old, and most of them are producing.

    Lemons

    True lemon
    Sweet lemon

    Oranges

    Sweet orange
    Bitter orange
    Navel orange
    Blood orange
    Satsuma mandarin
    Mandarina (another mandarin that is not Satsuma)

    Limes

    Key lime
    Tahiti lime
    Kaffir lime
    Mexican lime
    Limon Dulce (Sweet lime)
    Limon Agrio (Bitter lime)
    Limon Rojo (Red lime)

    Things that are not Lemons, Limes, or Oranges

    Red grapefruit
    White grapefruit
    Pummello
    Toronja (hybrid orange grapefruit)
    Citrumelo
    Tangerine
    Poncirus
     
  24. drichard12

    drichard12 Active Member 10 Years

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    Myself Im not in the tropics. I would not add any oil based to the tree when the sun is out. It;s best to add on a cloudy day.
     
  25. lorax

    lorax Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Ah then. All of the citrus growers here do it in full sun, since here cloudy = it will rain in the next 30 minutes.
     

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