Climbing roses

Discussion in 'Rosa (roses)' started by schusch, Sep 19, 2006.

  1. schusch

    schusch Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Hello -
    I'd like to ask a question regarding the best climbing rose(s) to plant to cover our garage, including the flat roof - right now it's already overgrown with all kinds of vine, but I'd like to add more color. I've seen pictures of the facade of a house being overgrown with roses in England - a grower/researcher has developed a hardier type, but I couldn't get the name of the rose - so I hope to get some recommendations from you.
    If you feel another type of flowering climber is more appropriate, since it would involve growing over or into other vegetation - feel free to recommend one.
    Thanks.
    Schusch
     
  2. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    How big is the structure - garage? Most of the giant climbers are ramblers, which are once bloomers. Rosa filipes 'Kiftsgate', for example, is a classic house eater. For repeat bloomers, my favourite would be 'New Dawn'. It is a vigorous climber and has nice double, pink flowers. Hoever, pruning it can be a daunting task.
     
  3. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    What other climbing plants are there now?
     
  4. schusch

    schusch Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Thanks for the replies.

    weekend gardener - The garage is a one car, flat roof, brick structure. Ron B - It is covered with evergreen vine (I couldn't find a specific name) as well as Polygonum (Fallopia) aubertii - the later grows pretty fast. The whole garage is covered.
    If these two prevent roses from climbing the structure, I might try one wall of the house (covered with vine, but no Polygonum).
    Thanks for the references already, and any other thoughts.
    Schusch
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    The knotweed does tend to be large-growing and to quickly get into other nearby plants during the growing season. Otherwise, it could be used to make a combination with pink roses. If the space is big enough and flowering times would overlap 'Paul's Himalayan Musk' might be suitable.
     
  6. schusch

    schusch Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Thanks a lot for all these suggestions. I'll look into the names you gave me.

    I have a beginner's question: do rambling roses need to be planted on the sunny side of the structure? or is this not so important, since the sun will hit the plant as it covers the structure (particularly the roof)?
    Schusch
     
  7. Weekend Gardener

    Weekend Gardener Active Member 10 Years

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    Roses are really sun worshippers. Your idea of having the rose planted on the shady side, to grow up over the roof to seek the sun may run into problems, as without adequate light, it may take a long time before the rose even gets tall enough to reach the sun. If that's the case, you would want to choose the most vigorous rambler you can find. Alternatively (I have only done this once, but it worked), grow the rose in an idea sunny position in a large container (at least 5 gallons) first. Once it has established a reasonable height (took 2 years for me, with Kiftsgate), plant it in the location you described.

    Another of my favourite vigorous rambler is Treasure Trove. The semi double flowers, with a pink tinge, may be more to your liking. One of the specimens in our back yard is on it's way up a cedar tree. Another surprisingly vigorous climber is Madame Alfred Carriere. It has fragrant white flowers, taking on a pinkish tone in cooler weather. Our 5 year old specimen is now 15 feet tall and growing. It has a huge spring flush of flowers, and a good suply of blooms through the rest of the season. It seems to take shade better than most climbers. This one won't be contented to just drape itself over the structure though. The long canes are a bit stiffer than the typical rambler. Think weeping willow type of fountain like canes.

    Mdm Alfred Carriere

    MAC 03Jun06 116 (Large).jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2006
  8. schusch

    schusch Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Hi weekend gardener-

    thanks for the additional ideas. I'll look into these cultivars. I'll plant where it gets at least some sun then, or try your pot idea until it's big enough.

    Generally speaking, which book on roses do you recommend?

    thanks.
    Schusch
     
  9. FallouiFalls

    FallouiFalls Member

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    Is it a necessity to plant the roses in the ground once it has reached a suitable height? Or can it stay in the pot permanently and still thrive? My backyard is paved, and it would be a pity to have to remove a few of the slabs... I must say that your roses look very impressive, Weekend Gardener! I have no idea what this variety is called, but it is a climbing rose, apparently - the colour, the petals, the fragrance, the profusion of flowers in spring, ... it's perfect! If only I knew its name...

    Christine
     

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  10. 1950Greg

    1950Greg Active Member

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    Langley, B.C. Stones throw from old HBC farm.
    There are some older ramblers that might be your best choice.Some are shade tolerant and will grow considerably in the first year. Kew Rambler and Cecil Brunner are two but as was said before most hardy breeds are once blooming. All repeat blooming roses started from Chinese varieties making them not as tolerant of the cold. Two places online you might want to take a look at are Help Me Find Roses (a great resource and online help) and one supplier Hortico Nurseries who supply mainly in Canada and have a mail order service which is quite good. Help Me Find Roses also has a list of suppliers around the world ,once you get use to the site you will find it valuable.
     

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