Concern regarding SmartCote fertilizer for roses

Discussion in 'Soils, Fertilizers and Composting' started by HortLine, Apr 16, 2002.

  1. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

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    The following was received via email:

    Having purchased SmartCote for Roses I thought I was all set, only to discover upon reading the label that the only nutrients listed were nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. Are there micronutrients in this product and is this a slow release fertilizer? Should I use this product in conjunction with a quick release. If so, which one? I feel the micronutrients are important. Don't you?
     
  2. HortLine

    HortLine Active Member 10 Years

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    Slow release fertilizers come in two types. One releases nutrients over a long period, typically 90 days, whatever the temperature. The other type releases for a similar period of time, but only if the temperature is sufficiently high - about 20 degrees Celsius. You should check on the label or with the supplier to check which kind of slow release fertilizer you have bought.

    Yes, micronutrients are important for roses and many other plants, notably rhododendrons. Local societies, such as the Vancouver Rose Society (if you live in the GVRD) can help you with requirements and suggestions. With any slow release fertilizer, caution prevails in further nutrient applications. Best to err on the side of caution!
     
  3. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  4. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    With fertilizers for sale in BC you will find the guaranteed minimum analysis of nutrients on the side of the box, most times in small print, if the nutrient isnt listed there, it probably isnt in the box. A point to consider, the guaranteed minimum analysis is exactly that, the product in the box MUST contain the percentages listed as a minimum, catch is, but they can exceed these quoted percentages as much as the please, so you might be getting a lot more nutrients than you think.
     

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