Evergreen shrub (not sure which kind) died

Discussion in 'Gymnosperms (incl. Conifers)' started by tehee, Aug 1, 2011.

  1. tehee

    tehee Active Member 10 Years

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    I apologize for being so vague. But I am attaching a photo of a large evergreen shrub that recently died. It has been in the location for years but this spring/summer it simply died. I don't know what it is but hopefully someone will know from the picture. Does anyone have any idea what may have caused this. I don't think anything different was done this year than any other year.

    Thank you.
     

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  2. ian66

    ian66 Active Member

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  3. Luke Harding

    Luke Harding Active Member

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    Yep, its a Chamaecyparis lawsoniana variety and they are quite vulnerable to several of the Phytophthora pathogens.
    As Ian66 has suggested, the roots may have been killed by Phytophthora (a fungus). The disease causing most concern at the moment in the UK, belongs to this genus and is known as Phytophtora ramorum (sudden oak death) but there are literally hundreds of species in this group of fungi. It may be quite difficult to identify exactly which one.
    There is also a chance that Armillaria (Honey fungus)may have caused the tree to expire. Were there any 'toadstools' on or near the tree?
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It's not a Lawson's Cypress Chamaecyparis lawsoniana - either a Hinoki Cypress Chamaecyparis obtusa, or an Arborvitae Thuja occidentalis. The pic isn't quite clear enough to tell which.
     
  5. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Hinoki. I've had one go brown recently also. Some forms appear to be a bit tender, otherwise it would be expected to be pathogenically caused.
     
  6. Luke Harding

    Luke Harding Active Member

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    Ooops. That'll teach me to not open the picture files for a closer look. You're quite right. Not C. lawsoniana at all!
    I'd go with C. obtusa of some sort.
     

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