Help identifying these aloe plants?

Discussion in 'Cacti and Succulents' started by csciore, Apr 26, 2009.

  1. csciore

    csciore Member

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    Could anyone help me with identification of these 2 aloe plants? Thank you!
     

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  2. Joey D

    Joey D Active Member

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    Is it possible to get a broader picture of the first one? I have similar Aloe plants on my campus and it would be helpful to know whether they are the same or just similar.
     
  3. csciore

    csciore Member

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    Thanks, Joey D. I will attempt to get a broader picture. I guess it would help to see the entire plant!
     
  4. Joey D

    Joey D Active Member

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    I wish I could attach a link to a picture I took of the plants I'm thinking of. I may be able to find a way to link to the picture tomorrow or upload it to an album here. My computer doesn't seem to want to cooperate at the moment :-/
     
  5. Joey D

    Joey D Active Member

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    Does it look like this? I can't tell if they are different species or just at different stages in development...
     

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  6. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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  7. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Not A. maculata (A. saponaria is outdated) as the leaves aren't 'maculated' (spotted).
     
  8. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Thanks saltcedar on giving me the uptodate name. However, we are still waiting for csciore to post a pic of the leaves, so they may be spotted. I was just having a go based on the flowers. I could be miles out I know, hence ???? and praps!
     
  9. csciore

    csciore Member

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    Thanks for all the replies! Sorry for the delay in responding... I have not yet been able to go back and take a broader photo of the aloe, showing the leaves and all. I will try to do it soon! I do not think it is the same one as the one Joey D. posted above, but I may be wrong. Thanks for all your input!

    Anyone have any input on the second aloe, the orange-flowered one? I'd better get a broader photo of that one too.

    I will try to post better pictures of both these aloes soon! I believe they are both native to South Africa, so that ought to help a little. ...Thank you!

    Camilla
     
  10. csciore

    csciore Member

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    Kudos to Silver Surfer! (and to saltcedar for the correct name) You were right, my first mystery aloe is Aloe maculata! See photo at:

    http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/170379

    It turns out the leaves are maculated. I didn't picture the leaves up close in my original photo, sorry. Attached is my photo of the leaves.

    Joey D., I think the photo you posted of the aloe on your campus is Aloe arborescens. See photos at:

    http://www.metafro.be/prelude/view_plant?pi=00873

    Again, thanks everyone for your input!
     

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  11. csciore

    csciore Member

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    Now, for my second aloe photo. I'm wondering, is this also Aloe maculata? I've looked at many, many photos on the internet, and I can't tell. I'm attaching again my original photo of the flowers, plus a photo of the leaves. They are spotted like the Aloe maculata leaves, but they don't have teeth, as compared with the photo I posted above, where the leaves have teeth.
     

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  12. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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  13. aloes

    aloes Member

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    This is Aloe arborescens. A very easy aloe to grow. It forms a bush up to 2 meters high.
     
  14. aloes

    aloes Member

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    Very much Aloe buhrii On the first photo I thought maybe hybrit but on these photos I would say that is the species plant.

    That leaves may be slightly maculated but it is not Aloe maculata. Note the teeth on the leaves differ and the shape of the rosette.
    I would like to show photos but I do not see how.
     
  15. Laticauda

    Laticauda Active Member

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  16. aloes

    aloes Member

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    Here are the photos I hope it was done the right way.
    The first photo is Aloe buhrii. The flowers can be any shades of yellow to orange. I added a photo of Aloe maculata in the wild habitat and close-up of the leaves in the garden. The plants differ a lot growing in shade or sun. Also whether in drought or easy in a garden.

    By the way. When you remove an old leave and there is still a small portion with gel inside, peel the outer green and smear the gel on your skin. Silky feeling. Not the green outer skin, also not the sap (eejuk never taste the sap), just the gel. The gel is also tasteless and can be eaten, but that is another story. Try it on your skin.
    You can use any leaf, it is just a pity to remove new leaves.

    I must go on to do my "working" now. Got some orphan kittens etc.
     

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