herb garden advice

Discussion in 'Annuals, Biennials, Perennials, Ferns and Bulbs' started by sungodess134, Apr 28, 2007.

  1. sungodess134

    sungodess134 Active Member

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    Port St. Lucie, FL
    I have a small area in my yard about 3ft. all sides facing east. It would get a good amount of sun in the morning, but it sits under the overhang of my home, so it gets partial sun. There is a small tree in the center, and I also have a potted rosemary plant, just placed in the dirt that does very well there. I would like to set up a small herb garden and thought this might provide the spot. Does anyone have any suggestions? I have a basil plant and a chive plant in pots, but they don't seem to thrive there, or maybe they need to be placed in larger pots or planted. I don't mind planting the garden in this area, or placing containers there I would just like to do what is best. So can you help me? thanks. me.
     
  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    While looking at a small herb garden for myself, I discovered that many herbs prefer full sun - at least many of the ones I wanted! Basil and chives, I suspect, would both prefer full sun as examples.

    That's not much help, but I'd be interested to hear what others suggest for herbs in partial shade as well.
     
  3. Artemisia

    Artemisia Member

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    I am guessing here that you are thinking of culinary and perhaps tea herbs? I will preface my comments by saying I have experience gardening only in Ontario and BC, (I see you are in Florida). As Daniel mentioned, most herbs (especially those for cooking) like full sun. Basil does, but I find chives do fine for me in partial shade. They develop a pretty dense root system - maybe you could try yours in the ground. Bay laurel also does well in partial shade. Oregano would likely be fine.

    Lovage does well in partial shade but it gets pretty big. The leaves have a celery flavour that is nice in soups and stews. All of the mints do well in partial shade, but they spread with enthusiasm, so you would want to restrain them in a good sized pot or tub. Fresh peppermint is wonderful for tea. Lemon balm is another one that is good for tea, especially along with mint. And both German and Roman chamomile can take some shade.

    The thing is you are talking about a small space here and you already have a rosemary in it, yes? A combination of the rosemary, a bay laurel, chives, and oregano would likely be lots. Well I would stick some parsley in there too. Keep in mind that rosemaries and bays can get big, so you would want to keep them pruned... but you could do that judiciously as you cook! Just to add something low for balance, you could try some thyme, especially while the rosemary and bay get established.

    I hope these ideas are helpful.

    A.
     
  4. sungodess134

    sungodess134 Active Member

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    Thank you so much A., that is exactly the kind of advice I was looking for. I'm pretty experimental in cooking and wouldn't mind trying new herbs out that would grow well there. The rosemary is in the site, but it is in a pot so I can just place it next to it, I have it there for now so it's out of the way. I am very excited to go and try out your suggestions.
     
  5. Artemisia

    Artemisia Member

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    You are welcome. You might just try basil planted in the ground rather than a pot, just to see if it will do. It is such a pleasure to have. I hope you enjoy your new little herb garden. Herbs are really such a joy!

    A.
     
  6. The Scared Gardener

    The Scared Gardener Member

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    I also started an herb garden recently and live in SE Florida so I too was concerned about placement/sun exposure. I potted basil, rosemary and parsley (each have their own pot) and placed them in the backyard which is has a southern exposure. They are in the sun all day and absolutely thrive. I only have to water them a couple times a week which helps given our drought situation. Because they've done so well, I'm considering expanding my herb collection.
     
  7. Annell

    Annell Active Member

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    hello. I have found that mints and lemon balm does very well in part shade as does parsley. But if you plant mint and lemon balm keep them in pots or they're take over! (which might not be a bad thing)

    Anne
     
  8. Kitchen Gardener

    Kitchen Gardener Member

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    I've had success with cilantro in shade and partial shade.I grow a few varieties of mint,English,orange and catmint.All my sages seem to grow well wherever their pots are placed in the yard ,one year in sun and one in shade ,hasn't seemed to affect it one way or the other. I love lavenders also.Lemon thyme is delicious but I have grown apple and wild thyme .I love a silver leafed herb with yellow flowers called curry plant and would love to know it's real name?
     
  9. Artemisia

    Artemisia Member

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    Curry plant is Helichrysum italicum. Funny that it is italicum, n'est-ce pas?

    Cheers,
    April
     
  10. Dave-Florida

    Dave-Florida Active Member

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    East-facing areas are good for plants that don't like high heat. Rosemary is likely to be happier on a mound of sand or pot on the west side. Things you might try include:
    Cuban "oregano" (actually a south Asian coleus relative)
    African oregano
    Basil--any kind
    parsley (but it attracts caterpillars)
    lemongrass

    Many of these plants may be happier in the winter. If you have time to visit Heathcote Botanical Garden in Ft Pierce, they have a good herb garden.
     

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