hottest week of the year

Discussion in 'Maples' started by paxi, Jul 24, 2008.

  1. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    I double checked the web and historically this is the hottest week of the year here in st. louis. Average highs about 91 F. Which is historically your hottest week of the year?

    In my mind I thought the red leafs dissectums would seem more hardy than the greens but for my first summer the pattern is just the opposite all of my red leaf dissectums have a fair amount of tip burn and spots, but on the flip side none of the greens seem any worse for the wear. Special kudos to omure yama which seems to be just thriving in the full hot sun.
     
  2. blake

    blake Active Member 10 Years

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    Looking at my local forecast I see Saturday will be the first of 5 straight days with daily high temperatures of 101-102F (38-39C) and evening lows of 79F (26C).

    Historically it appears we do not have a hottest week but rather about a month. Data shows an average daily high of 97F (36C) from July 21st - August 13th.
     
  3. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    wow! Let me know what maples do well under those conditions - could be some additions to the wishlist :)
     
  4. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    You guys have now turned to survival mode ;o))

    Good luck

    Gomero
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Yesterday was the hottest of the year so far, reaching 23°C. One other day about 3 weeks ago reached 22°. Don't think there's been any other days over 20°.
     
  6. mattlwfowler

    mattlwfowler Active Member Maple Society

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    It is in our worst part of the season here in SC too. Sunday the 20th we saw 97 F, Monday 101 F, and Tuesday 97 F again. Luckily we have had a nice cold front move in and we saw 92 F Wednesday and only about 89 F today I think. Time to bring out the sweaters :)
     
  7. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    We hit 28 C yesterday, 27 C today. Tomorrow more seasonal, 21.

    In 2003 we were over 40 C for 10 days, the high was 44. Miserable, although downstairs in the house it never got over 24. (Stone walls are good for something!)

    -E
     
  8. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    week?? ;)) in my zone Jun ,July and august the temperature is over 35/37 °whit many days over 40°....last year 4 months not rained...however the hottest week is the first of august have a Italian name "soleone"= sole- Leone=lion sun ...this year is fantastic temp.max not over 33° and rained many..
    ciao
     
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    23°C again today, then for tomorrow the sea fret is forecast to roll in . . . so it'll be foggy and 16° max.
     
  10. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    In Middle Tennessee, we typically have our warmest weather the end of July to first part of August. August is the driest month, followed by October. This year has actually been cooler than normal, with less humidity.

    A few stats for my area:
    • July is the average warmest month.
    • The highest recorded temperature was 109°F in 1952.
    • The average coolest month is January.
    • The lowest recorded temperature was -23°F in 1985.
    • The most precipitation on average occurs in May.
     
  11. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Katian4 welcome in The Maple Society!;))
     
  12. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Thanks Alex!
     
  13. paxi

    paxi Active Member

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    I have a potentially silly follow up question :

    Today it is supposed to get up to 97 F, but on the radio they mentioned that the heat index could be up to 115 F. Which number is relevant to the plant; ie does it "feel" the 97 or 115? Just curious
     
  14. kaspian

    kaspian Active Member 10 Years

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    Mainers start collapsing when the heat reaches 80F / 27C. I really don't know what would happen if it topped 90 here.
     
  15. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Anything above 23°C is too hot for me!
     
  16. blake

    blake Active Member 10 Years

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    Heat Index is a combination of air temperature and relative humidity intended to convey how hot it feels to a human. So there's your answer.

    People cool off by perspiration which carries heat from the body when it evaporates. The higher the humidity the slower the evaporation rate and therefore the slower heat is removed. Plants transpire to cool themselves too (actually the sun makes them transpire). Anecdotally, a few weeks ago I was sitting under a 30 year old Acer Palmatum on my parents property. It was sunny and about 97F (36C) outside and every couple of minutes I'd get hit by a water droplet falling from the tree. As long as transpired water is replaced by new water from the roots the plant won't wilt.

    There are many products on the market that limit transpiration. And it makes perfect sense that keeping water in the plant is a good thing. But eventually you must reach a tipping point - the point in which the plant simply overheats because it cannot sufficiently cool itself (due to chemical inhibiter or relative humidity). Someday I'll do some experimenting with anti-transpirants and extreme summer heat. Heat we have plenty of. It's been over 100F (38C) for the past nine straight days (Saturday it was 106F (41C) and Sunday it was 107F (42C)). This week we get a break, a couple of days at only 97F-99F.
     
  17. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I must remember never to visit Dallas in August :)
     
  18. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    today in fara sabina 38°C! 75%umidity.
    soleone week!!
    leaves burned sigh!
     
  19. Gomero

    Gomero Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Alex, I am like you: it was 37°C yesterday and 38°C (100°C) today. Humidex was 49.
    Luckily we will lose 10 degrees tomorrow. Maples seem to be enjoying this balmy weather and getting some sun tan, specially at the leaf tips ;o))

    Gomero
     
  20. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Well, here in Houston we're close to the influence of the warm air from the Mexico's Gulf current. You guys are talking about a week/year over 90s. Here we have to deal with 2 months (june/July) with temperatures reaching 90s-100s (days and nights) and frecuently hot winds that already have fried some of my maples (even with the ones keeping in complete shade).
    As Gomero said, I already changed to "survival mode" from mid June to September when temperatures begin to get down slowly to 80s. August, tipically is the hottest month here with average highs 100+. Thanks to Hurricane 'Edouard', we got some needed rain here and it helped to get some "fresh" (90s?) air to my maples.

    P.S. In "survival mode" (all summer time) I forget the color of the leaves: all are almost brown. I just try to keep the maples alive. I know they will sprout again new leaves at the end of september or first days of octuber. Most of the maples will keep their leaves with autumn's color until mid december.

    Nelran
     
  21. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Alex,

    Very miserable indeed! Hope you have some shade for your little treasures to hide under in that heat. We get that in the South at times - but this year has been cooler than average. We will have mid 80's starting tomorrow for 10 days. A little relief! Wonderful!!

    As an aside, I saw a program on what the Mediterranean area used to be like before humans altered things (10,000 years ago). The whole area was like the Redwood Forrest in California, with huge Cedar and Fir trees hundreds of years old. Very lush. Then, over thousands of years man gradually cut down all the trees and altered the landscape forever. I guess there is a tiny remnant of the original forrest left in Morocco in the Atlas Mountains, but that's all. I wonder if your climate would be so hot if that forrest had remained? At least you would have a bit more shade!?

    Regards,
     
  22. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Nelran and Whis4ey,

    The weather for both of you is caused by the Gulf of Mexio. Its obvious in Texas where the weather starts, but in Ireland its probably taken for granted. The Gulf Stream swirls around the tip of Florida and then shoots up the Eastern US coast where it eventually veers off and heads right for - you guessed it - Ireland! The warm Gulf waters moderate the temperatures for all of the British isles, which would be a frozen waste-land without it. But the most pronounced effect is seen on the west coast of Ireland, where palm trees grow! (no joke- I've been there and seen it myself). Get out a map and you'll see that Ireland is on the same latitude as Hudson Bay, Canada (frozen tundra!) That's a pretty dramatic moderation of climate, I would say!! So send a little Blarney to Nelran, Whis4ey, cause his Texas Gulf Coast waters are keeping you and your trees from turning into Irish Icicles!! ;-D
     
  23. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Max 17°C and raining on-and-off all day here . . .

    38° sounds just too nasty to contemplate. A full eight degrees above the absolute maximum ever recorded here.
     
  24. Kaitain4

    Kaitain4 Well-Known Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Proof of the Gulf Stream Effect :-) *


    First pic is a Church in Kenmare - SW coast of Ireland. Look closely at the steeple.

    Next 3 pics are in Kildare - central Ireland and home of the Irish National Stud. They have an incredible Japanese Garden there (which includes a a palm tree).

    Last pic is from Ballina in northwest Ireland. This is a 10 acre garden on a private estate. Look to the left.


    *sorry for the quality - I had to scan in some photos.
     

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  25. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    You're right, Kaitain, The gulf stream get warm here an transport part of the heat to the northern Europe. It's like a huge and very efficient thermodinamic machine. Anyway, Whis4ey, we have more heat here in case you need more....
     

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