hybrid palms

Discussion in 'Outdoor Tropicals' started by kevind76, Dec 5, 2009.

  1. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    Just a question - are there any hybrid Palms around? All I have ever heard about is species, but has anyone tried to hybridize warm-growing species with cold-tolerant species to perhaps give more variety and perhaps a more 'tropical' look to colder climate gardens? Or, even hybridize tropical species to give more variety and different looks? Can the different genera be bred together?
     
  2. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    In general, only feasible between members of a single genus or at most between closely related genera. Probably not a lot of options for combining cold-tolerance and 'tropical' appearance within these limits.

    There's a hybrid between Washingtonia filifera and W. robusta, which got named Washingtonia × filibusta, guess what they called it . . .
     

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  3. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    Thanks. So, if it is feasible between species in the same genera, are there any other hybrids around besides the one you listed? Palms are popular tropical landscape plants, and I would think someone would have tried to create something new and unique by now.
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Some think many windmill palms grown in western gardens as Trachycarpus fortunei are actually hybrids.
     
  5. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    What with?
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Other species in the genus.
     
  7. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Perhaps, but more predomently are the varying chacteristics when closely examined.
    This could account for natural hybridization and random emerging genetic traits. That's evident in seeds grown from the same tree producing differing characteristics.
    Chamaerops humilis also produces palms with numerous appearances, the reasons for that is unclear, since it's natural range and lack of other species in the genus wouldn't seemingly allow. Trachycarpus however has a long history and crossed bloodlines.
    Your original question has much to do with chomosome compatibility. In other words, you could never cross Trachycarpus with say Latania to produce a hardier genus.

    Cheers, Barrie.
     
  8. kevind76

    kevind76 Active Member

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    Thanks for the info. I did some looking on my own, and it turns out there are Palm hybrids, even ones that are pushing the PNW hardiness level! Genera used are mostly Butia and Jubaea. I don't know about tropical ones, though. Apparently ther are agricultural hybrids, like those used for Palm oil.
     
  9. LPN

    LPN Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Absolutely. Butia, Jubaea, Syagrus all have chomosomes that match up "nicely" making hybridization possible. There is however a process involved is the cross pollenization which was studied extensively by Dr. Merrill Wilcox, professor at the University of Florida in Gainsville.

    Cheers, LPN.
     

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