In the Garden: What is this Plant?!?!

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by corl8345, Aug 7, 2012.

  1. corl8345

    corl8345 Member

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    Location:
    Nicholasville, KY
    Would someone mind helping me identify this neighboring plant?

    It grows right outside against the house

    thanks so much!
    -Robbie
     

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  2. Weedbender

    Weedbender Active Member 10 Years

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    Location:
    MD Zone 7
    Looks like Kerria japonica.
     
  3. corl8345

    corl8345 Member

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    Location:
    Nicholasville, KY
    THanks for the fast reply!

    dont know though. I live in Kentucky, and that would mean someone who lived here before me ordered the seeds and planted it since that's not a U.S. plant.

    I was questioning the possibility of maybe it being an elm seedling?

    what do you guys think?

    -Robbie
     
  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Location:
    WA USA (Z8)
    Does look Ulmaceous. If not elm maybe hackberry.
     
  5. saltcedar

    saltcedar Rising Contributor 10 Years

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    Location:
    Austin, Tx
    Ditto Celtis
     
  6. corl8345

    corl8345 Member

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    Location:
    Nicholasville, KY
    Thank you all for your contributions!

    I am going with the hackberry as the solution to my dilemma.
    Why I have a hackberry tree plant in a random spot in my yard is beyond me, but it is unmistakably identical to what the hackberry tree leaf looks like.

    thanks again

    -Robbie
     
  7. Tony Rodd

    Tony Rodd Active Member

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    Location:
    Sydney Australia
    The leaf veins looping before reaching teeth is different from veining in elms, which have mostly straight veins ending in teeth. This, as well as its zig-zag shoot tips, should make it a hackberry. Hackberries are now placed in family Cannabaceae together with hops and Indian hemp, on the strength of molecular evidence.
     

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