Kaffir Lime tree questions....

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by 82Stang, Mar 12, 2006.

  1. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    82Stang, you may want to be careful with the coconut bricks or coir. I remember reading about people having different experiences depending on the source of the coir. Some material had a high salt content which is bad for citrus. Assuming the coir you bought is okay, I wonder if adding peat to it would make the medium too moisture retentive.
     
  2. 82Stang

    82Stang Member

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    That's why I wanted to come on here and ask people who know more about this before I go ahead and wreck my tree. Should I just mix the brick with regular bark or some orchid mix?
     
  3. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Stang, it is great news that your tree is coming around. Citrus really are quite durable trees, and can take a lot of abuse. Much of the turn around is also due to spring, with longer and warmer days. Actually living in Lloydminster, Canada, with the extra long summer days that your area receives, the tree should recover very well. I would *NOT* add peat moss to the coconut bricks (which is called coir). The wetted coconut brick actually is a substitute for peat moss. Mixing one part coir (coconut brick) with 3 or 4 parts bark chips would be a pretty good growing medium. The main difference between CHC and bark chips, is that bark degrades a lot faster than CHC's. Thanks for letting us know about your tree, it should really fill out in the next month. Take Care. - Millet
     
  4. 82Stang

    82Stang Member

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    Thank guys! Now I can repot my tree with a little more certainty that I am not gonna kill it. If I don't get called into work tomorrow that will be my project for the day.

    When re-potting do you get rid of all the old soil? Or just add new stuff around the old stuff?
     
  5. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Follow up: Junglekeeper is correct about possible higher salt levels in coir, depending on where the source of the coir came from. So, to be safe, soak and then rinse the coir three times in clean clear water to flush out any possible contamination (if indeed there is any). Then a 1 part coir and 3 or 4 part bark chip mixture (by volume) should be quite safe. On the last soak/rinse add 1/2 teaspoon Epson Salts and 1/2 teaspoon Calcium Nitrate (if you have a source) per every 2 gallons water to the final soak. This will achieve the cation exchange. - Millet
     
  6. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    When repoting to a larger container, 1/2 to 1 inch of the growing media (soil) should be removed VERY CAREFULLY SO AS TO CAUSE NO ROOT DAMAGE, from the outer edge of the root mass. This will expose many of the outer roots and allow them to grow quickly into the new planting area provided. Begin fertilizing when you first see any new growth starting. - Good Luck. - Millet
     
  7. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Millet, do you think there's much risk in using unsterilized bark chips in a mix? Large bags are available in my area at low cost. It looks clean enough. I know of a shop that uses the product for their orchids.
     
  8. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    I would think the bark should be fine, especially when sold by an orchid supplier. - Millet
     
  9. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    I asked the same question at the shop. The person said they took their chances with the bark and didn't mention having any trouble with it and I didn't think to ask at that time.
     
  10. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Just be sure that the bark "chips" are not to big. 1/4 to 1 inch would be good. - Millet
     
  11. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    They appeared to be the right size but will definitely have a closer look the next time I'm there. Thanks.
     

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