Lighting

Discussion in 'Conversations Forum' started by daily joe, Aug 10, 2005.

  1. I just wanted to let everyone know that i read american nuseryman magazine and found this product called ozonelite. it's a light bulb that replicates outside light, closest to the sunlight. i ordered a box of bulbs and will keep you posted.
    thanks,
    joe
     
  2. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    I would appreciate the web site if there is one. It must be quite a breakthrough, because a single lamp always is deficient at some part of the spectrum. Yes! I am interested in technical details.
    Durgan.
     
  3. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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  4. Durgan

    Durgan Contributor 10 Years

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    I have been using the 23 watt bulb type flourescent type for several years. These are supposed to be equivalent in light power to possibly a 60 watt incondescent. I generally find they are not bright enough in many cases, but for an outdoor light they are sufficient or in a three bulb fixture they are fine. They also won't start quickly if the temperature is low, say for a unheated garage location. All these bulbs really do is convert more of the input power to light, this conversion is still horrendously inefficient. Most power consumption in an incandesenct bulb produces heat. Now if one could get the light without the heat-that would be something or at least improve the ratio of heat to light.

    The 42 watt ozonite would appear to be useful for lighting but the horrendous price leaves me cold. For plant growing I would consider it almost useless-not enough light, except maybe for one small plant.

    The germ killer babble is of little interest to me. Nobody has got sick as far as I know from our house germs. They are part of living if present. The site is mostly sales babble a polite term for BS. It seems the sales pitch is attempting to creat a demand for a product to kill germs in the house. I never knew this was a problem that required addressing. Note this term "Seasonal Affective Disorder" , a pure ad type crap. Hype, Hype, Hype.

    Now when and if the industry produces a low heat emitting, full spectrum, screw in bulb, at a reasonable price, I might be interested.

    Durgan
     
  5. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    While I am similarly skeptical about the claims regarding in-home airborne "contaminants", I'm not certain what part of Seasonal Affective Disorder you are criticizing as pure ad type crap - the product's claims or the disorder itself?

    If the former, well, I don't know enough about what is required to treat the disorder to judge the product's claims. If the latter, though, Seasonal Affective Disorder is very real:

    Seasonal Affective Disorder from the US National Mental Health Association

    Seasonal Affective Disorder from the US-based National Alliance for the Mentally Ill

    Seasonal Affective Disorder via the Canadian Mental Health Association
     

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