Meyer Lemon?

Discussion in 'Citrus' started by Ralph Walton, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. Ralph Walton

    Ralph Walton Active Member 10 Years

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    In the dust bunnies in the back of my cluttered brain is a comment from who-knows-where that a Meyer Lemon is not "really" a lemon. It's one of those plants on my "list" and will remain there (until I actually get one) regardless of the answer, but I'm curious: any truth to this rumor/comment?

    Ralph
     
  2. lemon_dreams

    lemon_dreams Active Member

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    from what I've read a meyer is not a true lemon, it is a cross between an orange and a lemon. Its a more mild lemon, but still definatly has the lemon taste.
     
  3. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    The true parentage of the Meyer lemon is unknown but one parent is thought to be either a mandarin or an orange. Ralph, I thought you were a grape guy. Branching into citrus?
     
  4. Millet

    Millet Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    When a Meyer Lemon matrues fully, the peel in orange in color and not yellow as most lemons. Very fussy tree to grow. - Millet
     
  5. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    In what way? Could you expand on this? Also, what can be done to make it less fussy?
     
  6. lemon_dreams

    lemon_dreams Active Member

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    I'm definatly starting to think that meyers are more fussy. out of all my trees, they are the ones to drop leaves and fruit/flowers... where my others aren't. I know I shocked them with the room temp and transplantting... but the others seem just fine.... meyers... not so much. My younger meyer is definatly doing better than the older... so maybe the one is just picky, fussy and has decided to be a pain in the butt. I just hope to see new growth in hte following weeks... its about all that'll ease my mind on its lack of flowers/fruit
     
  7. Ralph Walton

    Ralph Walton Active Member 10 Years

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    Junglekeeper: "Branching"??? The grapes are still the main focus but every now and again I find myself going out on a limb and growing something else just because. The Meyer got onto the list because I will (soon I hope) have a large dirt floored greenhouse (actually I already have one - I hope to have it erected soon) with some extra space in it.

    Ralph
     
  8. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Fun with words :)

    Warning: Citrus can be addictive. If I had a greenhouse it would be filled with a dazzling number of varieties. One can dream.
     
  9. Junglekeeper

    Junglekeeper Esteemed Contributor 10 Years

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    Ralph,
    Just to let you know, new shipments of Meyer lemons have been showing up recently around Vancouver. They're trees from Monrovia in 1-, 2-, and 5-gal pots, mostly in shrub form but a few patio trees as well. You may find the same selection in your area.
     
  10. 82Stang

    82Stang Member

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    Junglekeeper is right about how growing citrus trees can be addictive. I just picked up myself a Meyer lemon tree this weekend. Gonna go re-pot it right away here.
     
  11. punkrockviolet5

    punkrockviolet5 Member

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    Taken From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meyer_lemon

    Origin:
    The Meyer lemon (Citrus × meyeri) is originally from China and thought to be a cross between a true lemon and a mandarin orange. The Meyer lemon was introduced to the United States in 1908 as S.P.I. #23028, by the agricultural explorer Frank Meyer, an employee of the United States Department of Agriculture who collected a sample of the plant on a trip to China. It is commonly grown in China potted as an ornamental plant. It became popular as a food item in the United States after being rediscovered by chefs, such as Alice Waters at Chez Panisse, during the California Cuisine revolution.

    Description:
    Meyer lemon trees are around 6 to 10 feet (2–3 meters) tall at maturity, though can be pruned smaller. Its leaves are dark green and shiny, young leaves and shoots are dark purple. The flowers are white with a purple base and fragrant. The fruit is yellow and rounder than a true lemon with a slight orange tint when ripe. It has a sweeter, less acidic flavor than the more common lemon (Lisbon or Eureka are typical grocery store varieties) and a fragrant edible skin.

    Hope this helps! I'm new to the Citrus addiction so I found this info really interesting!
     
  12. Payi

    Payi Member

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    Hi, I would like to grow a couple of edible lemon trees. Sounds like you have a few. The area I will grow them is the Okanagan-Similkameen and I wonder if I can plant them on the ground (sandy) and what to do to protect them from freezing during the winter.
    Another thing are they subseptible to any pernicious pests? I cannot use any kind of pesticides, I could only use mechanical or cultural means to combat pests and weeds.
    Any advice would be welcome.
    Thanks
    Payi
     
  13. Ellen S

    Ellen S Member

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    What is a 'true' lemon? One that breeds true? If so, then a Meyer lemon is a 'true' lemon if you can grow Meyer lemon trees from Meyer lemon seeds (if there has been not cross pollination). That seems a bit complicated.

    I'd say if it looks like a lemon, smells like a lemon, tastes like a lemon, and quacks like a lemon, it's a lemon.

    Is a Delicious apple a 'true' apple? They are always more like bananas in taste and sawdust in texture than a Macintosh or a Northern Spy or a Gravenstein, but I'll betcha that are actually apples.

    Meyer lemons are shaped like lemons, too, although their skin is very easy to peel, unlike other lemons.

    Are people concerned that Meyers are not 'true' lemons because they MIGHT BE a cross between two other citrus species? How about those Pink Lemonade Lemons? Are they lemons? They are green and white or green and yellow on the outside and pink on the inside, most likely a cross between a something and a something, but they taste etc like lemons.

    Sorry to go on about this. Since Meyers have been grown for centuries in China, why do people think they are not lemons? Because Mr Meyer brought them back and they are named after him?
     
  14. aesir22

    aesir22 Active Member

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    Good question lol. True might mean true to type...meaning meyer seeds planted will be unique, not like the parent, Or it could be because they are half blood lol - half mandarin, half lemon. Though I guess it would be half-juice in this circumstance :)
     

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