More AI from openAI: chat

Discussion in 'Maples' started by emery, Dec 6, 2022.

  1. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    The DALLE work on Japanese maples was pretty amazing, so I thought I would try their new chatbot, which seems pretty wild according to the NY Times.

    My question: explain the issues associated with the increasing number of similar Japanese Maple cultivars.

    The response:

    There are several issues associated with the increasing number of similar Japanese Maple cultivars.

    1. Lack of genetic diversity: As more and more cultivars are developed, there is a risk of reduced genetic diversity within the species. This can lead to decreased resilience to diseases and pests, as well as a reduced ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions.

    2. Limited genetic variation: When there are too many similar cultivars, it becomes difficult to differentiate between them and to select unique and interesting varieties. This can result in a lack of genetic variation within the species, leading to monotony and a lack of interest in the plant.

    3. Difficult to identify and classify: With a large number of cultivars, it can become challenging to accurately identify and classify individual plants. This can lead to confusion and mislabeling, making it difficult for gardeners and horticulturists to properly care for and propagate the plants.

    4. Loss of traditional cultivars: As newer cultivars are developed and introduced, older and traditional cultivars may be lost or forgotten. This can result in the loss of valuable genetic material and traditional plant varieties.

    5. Financial implications: The development and introduction of new cultivars can be a costly and time-consuming process. This can lead to increased prices for the plants and can limit their availability to consumers.
    Well, that's pretty amazing. And, like DALLE, you can create various other versions.

    It really is very clever. To this question "Tell me a joke about when the ghosts of plant hunters Armand David, Earnest Wilson and Charles Sargent walk into a bar and discuss their deaths"

    I got back:

    The ghosts of plant hunters Armand David, Earnest Wilson and Charles Sargent walk into a bar and discuss their deaths. Armand David says, "I was poisoned by a plant I was collecting." Earnest Wilson says, "I died of dysentery on an expedition." Charles Sargent says, "I was trampled by a wild elephant." The bartender looks at them and says, "I guess you could say you all got "potted" in the end."

    Alternatively:

    The ghosts of Armand David, Earnest Wilson, and Charles Sargent walk into a bar and start discussing their deaths.

    David says, "I was killed by a bear while exploring China."

    Wilson says, "I was shot by a tribesman while collecting plants in the Amazon."

    Sargent says, "I died of old age in my sleep after a long and successful career."

    The bartender looks at them and says, "Well, at least you didn't have to suffer through a plant sale at Lowe's."

    Finally, in the style of Richard Pryor:

    When the ghosts of plant hunters Armand David, Earnest Wilson and Charles Sargent walk into a bar, they sit down and start discussing their deaths.

    Armand David says, "Man, I died from dysentery on a plant-hunting expedition in China. It was a real mess."

    Earnest Wilson chimes in, "I died from malaria on a plant-hunting expedition in Africa. It was a real pain in the butt."

    Charles Sargent laughs and says, "You guys think you had it bad? I died from a heart attack on a plant-hunting expedition in the Andes. Talk about a killer trip!"

    The bartender looks at the ghosts and says, "Well, at least you guys all died doing what you loved."

    To which Armand David responds, "Yeah, but now we're stuck haunting this damn bar for eternity. Talk about a plant-tastic afterlife!"

    Wow.
     
    ChrisUk, maf, AlainK and 2 others like this.
  2. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    I asked DALLE to recreate my scene with the ghosts, this was my favorite

    DALLE-ghosts.png
     
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  3. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    Excellent !
     
  4. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Amazing!

    Seems like the horticultural industry might be more sensibly run when the AI takes over the world!
     
  5. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Haha, maybe! The chatbot being right on the money for a few of the points really surprised me, but not as much as the ability to make a pretty decent pun, or make fun of a Big Box store.

    On the other hand, when I tried to have a conversation about maples, not only did it give me some wrong information. but told me it couldn't form opinions or pretend to feel emotions. Just not that kind of bot! Also, when I asked it a very specific question (which maples in Section Palmata have terminal buds) it punted by telling me it was unable to access the internet to search for any data beyond what it had been trained on.
     
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  6. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    One more. Hard to imagine being a uni lecturer these days, how to know that papers aren't being automagically generated? There's a mistake here, as there was in all of my tries, but it's in the details rather than the overall discussion. It's scary good, and also potentially really useful for trying to get a handle on a subject quickly.

    My Q: explain the role of endo-mycorrhizae in woody plant growth and discuss why some genera are symbiotic with ecto- rather than endo-mycorrhizae, explaining (if known) the advantages of both and giving examples of genera that form each type, or both types, of relationships

    Chatbot Answer:

    Endo-mycorrhizae are fungi that form a symbiotic relationship with the roots of woody plants. In this relationship, the fungi colonize the root tissue and provide the plant with additional water and nutrients, while the plant provides the fungi with organic compounds for energy. This mutualistic relationship can enhance the growth and health of woody plants.

    Some genera of woody plants are symbiotic with ecto-mycorrhizae, which are fungi that form a relationship with the outer surface of the plant roots. This type of relationship can provide similar benefits to the plant, but may be less efficient at providing water and nutrients.

    The advantages of endo-mycorrhizae over ecto-mycorrhizae are not well understood, but some studies have suggested that endo-mycorrhizae may be more effective at providing water and nutrients to the plant. Additionally, endo-mycorrhizae may be better adapted to certain soil conditions or plant species.

    Examples of genera that form endo-mycorrhizae relationships include Pinus, Fagus, and Betula. Examples of genera that form ecto-mycorrhizae relationships include Quercus, Salix, and Populus. Some genera, such as Picea and Abies, can form both types of relationships.
     
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  7. ChrisUk

    ChrisUk Active Member

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    I've asked the Chatbot what to do month by month to maintain a japanese maple.
    I got this answer:

    January:

    • Prune any dead or damaged branches
    • Clean up fallen leaves and debris from around the tree
    • Mulch around the base of the tree to protect roots from freezing temperatures
    February:

    • Watch for signs of pests, such as aphids, and treat as needed
    • Monitor for any signs of fungal diseases, such as verticillium wilt, and treat as needed
    • Apply a slow-release fertilizer to provide nutrients for the tree
    March:

    • Begin watering the tree regularly as the weather warms up
    • Check for any signs of pests or diseases and treat as needed
    • Prune any branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other to improve air circulation
    April:

    • Apply a pre-emergent herbicide to prevent weeds from growing near the tree
    • Continue to monitor for pests and diseases and treat as needed
    • Fertilize the tree with a balanced fertilizer to promote healthy growth
    May:

    • Begin watering the tree more frequently, especially during hot, dry periods
    • Check for any new pests or diseases and treat as needed
    • Prune any branches that are blocking sunlight or obstructing the view
    June:

    • Continue watering the tree regularly, making sure the soil is moist but not waterlogged
    • Monitor for any signs of pests or diseases and treat as needed
    • Prune any branches that are growing out of control or becoming too heavy
    July:

    • Begin preparing the tree for fall by gradually reducing watering
    • Check for any pests or diseases and treat as needed
    • Fertilize the tree with a balanced fertilizer to promote healthy growth
    August:

    • Reduce watering as the weather begins to cool off
    • Check for any pests or diseases and treat as needed
    • Prune any branches that are dead or damaged
    September:

    • Stop watering the tree completely, allowing the soil to dry out completely
    • Clean up any fallen leaves or debris from around the tree
    • Prune any branches that are blocking sunlight or obstructing the view
    October:

    • Begin preparing the tree for winter by mulching around the base to protect roots from freezing temperatures
    • Check for any pests or diseases and treat as needed
    • Prune any branches that are dead or damaged
    November:

    • Watch for any signs of pests or diseases and treat as needed
    • Prune any branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other to improve air circulation
    • Protect the tree from extreme cold temperatures by wrapping it in burlap or other protective material
    December:

    • Stop pruning the tree to allow it to enter a dormant state
    • Monitor for any pests or diseases and treat as needed
    • Protect the tree from extreme cold temperatures by wrapping it in burlap or other protective material.
     
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