More unknown Texas wilflowers

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by Leespark, Nov 25, 2005.

  1. Leespark

    Leespark Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North East Texas
    Hello all, I got such an amazing response on my last query, I decided to try again. This groul includes a 2nd pic of a small (1/4") flower that i asked about yesterday. It unfortunalely does not have any foliage visible either but i thought another view might help. I thank all who respond.

    Lee
     

    Attached Files:

  2. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Spokane, WA, USA
    Hi,

    I think the last picture, far right, is another salvia, but was unable to pin it down to a species. In fact after looking at some of the 900+ species/cultivars of salvia I'm a little less certain that I got the right name on your first set of photos. But there weren't too many growing in the wild so after considering it for a while, I'll stick by that name unless someone else comes up with a better one.

    Still no luck with the Fabaceae? on the left. There are a few plants like the brooms (Cytisus) that have similar flowers. Has that kind of look about it. But couldn't find anything to match with it.

    And finally, no idea about the center picture. Sorry I couldn't be much help here.

    Harry
     
  3. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Spokane, WA, USA
    Again I didn't realize the scale, after just rereading your post, if this is .25" or 1 cm then it's probably lotus unifolius var. unifolius. I know it as Spanish lotus, Spanish clover, and the USDA page calls it American trifoil birdsfoot lotus. That coincides with the three leaves that appear in the picture. Still could be mistaken on the id. het
     
  4. Leespark

    Leespark Member

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    North East Texas
    Thank you Harry (wrygrass),
    You have been more than generous with your assistance. I did further research on the salvia, horsenettle, and bitterweed you identified and i am certain you were correct. I will follow up on this lotus and let you know what i find.
    If it is of any assistance, let me mention that the asteracae (in my first posting) grows on a stiff almost woody thin stalk that reaches several feet in height. This stalk has a lot of equally stiff side branchesthat grow up and out and the blooms are prolific and long lasting. It took a couple of freezes before these flowers gave it up for the season. In this group, the red seedpod looking one in the center grew on a 8" stalk that looked like some form of a grass. However there were just a very few of them in the area (sunny open field) where they were located. The third flower in this posting had a ground vine growing habit. A single plant spread out in several directions and had these flowers and seed pods that appear to be seperate plants but are all connected with the main vine structure. Everything on it (flowers,stalk,seed pods, and leaves) had a hairy appearance. It also grew in an open field and the recent freeze got it.
    I got started with this interest in photographing and identifing wild flowers, late in this past growing season. but I have managed to find andphotograph several dozen late seasons ones so far and I have a lot of them identified because i knew the name or found it in one of my reference books. You have helped me with most of the rest. It is with gratitude that i again say "Thank You".

    Lee
     
  5. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Spokane, WA, USA
    In the center picture, I'm pretty sure those are buds. The freeze probably got it before they could open. You said it was grasslike in appearance, does that mean it had grasslike leaves? If that is the case that would help narrow it down. Also, it appears to have a square or at least angled stem. Would you know if that is true too?

    Harry
     
  6. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

    Messages:
    10,578
    Likes Received:
    615
    Location:
    Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    I've a hunch that the photograph on the far right is a plant in either the Hydrophyllaceae (water-leaf family) or Boraginaceae (borage family). A quick browse through Rickett's Wildflowers of the US (Texas) doesn't offer many hints to the ID, though.
     
  7. Dee M.

    Dee M. Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western Washington
    I though of Boraginaceace right away too, but haven't had time to pursue it.
     
  8. wrygrass2

    wrygrass2 Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Spokane, WA, USA
    Couldn't find it on any of the texas wildflower pages that I looked at, but my thought was that it might be a garden variety. It seems terribly familiar. There was a lady down on the end of the block that grew some borage for what ails you. Maybe that was it. Right now its under a foot of snow though. Where's that global warming when you need it? :)

    Harry
     
  9. tipularia

    tipularia Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,388
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Northeast Texas USA
    Leespark, are you still around? Just found these last year's posts from someone in my neck of the woods.
    #1 probably begger ticks, Desmodium, the seeds stick to you like velcro.
    #2 looks like a Polygonum.
     
  10. Takana_Hana

    Takana_Hana Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    155
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western Illinois USA
    1st one - goats rue Tephrosia viriginiana 3rdone- lady's thumb smartweed
     
  11. Raniusia

    Raniusia Member

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Katowice Poland
    Center one - try Persicaria affine.

    R.
     
  12. tipularia

    tipularia Well-Known Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    1,388
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    Northeast Texas USA
    Tephrosia virginiana has a cream colored banner. After looking at more images and a Desmodium growing in my yard, I am leaning toward Galactia.
     
  13. David in L A

    David in L A Active Member 10 Years

    Messages:
    671
    Likes Received:
    27
    Location:
    Los Angeles, U.S.
    3rd - Echium plantagineum?
     

Share This Page