Natural pest controllers in action

Discussion in 'Maples' started by maf, Apr 3, 2022.

  1. maf

    maf Generous Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Just watched two Blue Tits hunting for aphids on a budding dissectum. Managed to catch a few pics on my phone which has a half decent zoom for a phone. Taken from inside house through a window so clarity will not be perfect.
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  2. Acerholic

    Acerholic Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout Maple Society

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    There nothing better than natural predation and they look good as well.
     
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  3. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    We don't seem to get a lot of them around here, I wonder if Alain sees them? Such lovely things.

    It's been a massive infestation of aphids this spring, and the predators (ladybirds mostly) aren't here yet, or not much. Since there are no flowers around in the maples I've been doing some careful spraying with pyrethrins, the first time in many years I've used this kind of control. Happily it isn't toxic for birds (though very toxic for aquatic life), and is a contact poison. Not the greatest, though.
     
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  4. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

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    I can occasionnally see one or two here, but the "locals" in my garden are black-headed ones, "mésanges charbonnières". I can see them every morning, but they fly away as soon as I open the door, they're very shy, not like robins that try to get the worms two feet from the spade when I dig the garden.

    La mésange charbonnière : comment vit-elle ? Tout savoir sur la mésange
     
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