need to replant 15 year old sugar maple

Discussion in 'Maples' started by schusch, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. schusch

    schusch Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    I need to re-plant a 15 year old sugar maple that was put in the ground only 2 years ago: it turns out, after inspection, that the gardener who put it in the soil had it buried about 15 or more inches too deep, meaning the rootflare lies that deep. The tree is doing fine, but many fine roots are swirling around the trunk, rather than away from the trunk, etc. So I decided to replant it correctly. My question is: when is the best time to do this - how long after the leaves have fallen on the ground? Anything else I need to look out for in a tree that tall, or old? Any input is much appreciated
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Lift and replant when leafless, if you are warmer than USDA 6 exact timing not critical, although right after leaf drop would be ideal. Circling roots are caused by growth in containers, if those are what you have these should be pulled open or cut when replanting. If there is a knot of major roots at the base of the trunk that cannot be corrected the tree may fail later, a friend has a long-established snakebark maple that is now pinching itself off (girdling itself) with a circling root on one side. If bad enough you might as well discard the tree now, if correctible do be sure to get it straightened out before replanting.
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Agree with Ron. Luxembourg is USDA zone 7 (i.e., warmer than zone 6).
     
  4. schusch

    schusch Active Member Maple Society 10 Years

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    Thanks for the detailed suggestions. I'll check. I'm hopeful there will not be major roots that are girdling since only 2 years in the ground (knock on wood...). Upon inspection I just noticed a potential problem insofar as roots were raising to the surface in the vicinity of the trunk, rather than away from the trunk, which would lead to problems later. (I didn't see any girdling, but then again I stopped inspecting when it became clear how deep the tree had been planted).
    Thnaks for the info.
     

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