planting acer palmatum 'Tamukeyama'

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Jocelie, Oct 31, 2007.

  1. Jocelie

    Jocelie Member

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    I have just gotten my first Japanese maple, a Tamukeyama. It's about 2.5 feel tall--probably about 2 years old? I'm planting it in a raised bed, in a shady part of my backyard/patio.

    Could someone give me planting instructions? I would like to stake it a bit, in order to increase its uprightness as it grows.

    Thanks! Jocelie
     
  2. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Hi welcome, for increase up rigth use bamboo stick for planting
    good dreinage and good umidity of roots, shady part is good ,for more of planting read in FAQ "how to plant maple"(top page)and after Tamukeyama wich maple are you interesting?ciao alex
     
  3. spookiejenkins

    spookiejenkins Active Member

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    Tamukeyama is a beauty. Good choice. :)

    Alex has you on the right track... Do be sure to check out the "How to Plant a Maple" thread in the Acer forum. It is under the FAQ heading.

    My only recommendations - ensure that the soil drains very well (this should not be a problem in a raised bed) and DON'T OVER-FERTILIZE. Let the soil feed your tree.

    Also, a great product to use for transplanting and general maple health (great for all plants) is a liquid seaweed. There are lots of different brands. In Mass you can probably find Maxicrop or Neptune's Harvest at your local garden center.

    I am glad you found your maple. They are wonderful and addictive!!! :)
     
  4. Jocelie

    Jocelie Member

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    Thanks so much, Alex66 and SpookieJenkins, for the helpful replies! I live in Massachusetts, and am now worrying that my maple, in the shade, won't "color up" very well. But the form is lovely in any case. And, yes, it's already addictive, and I've only had it one day!
    Any suggestions for other small maples that will do well in the shade in a New England backyard?...
     
  5. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Jm (Japanese maple)Ukigumo,one classic Sango Kaku,and this for today First Gosth
    pics Sango Kaku in autum...
     

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  6. spookiejenkins

    spookiejenkins Active Member

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    Jocelie - There are many maples that thrive in a shady spot. Alex66 named a few greats! In general, green-leaved cultivars do well with more shade than the red leaved ones. AND a green and white leaved (or variegated) tree will like the shade even better, and they can be really exciting!

    Have you purchased any books on maples yet? That might be the best place to start. I would wholeheartedly recommend the book "Japanese Maples" by J.D. Vertrees. It's kind of the maple lover's bible. :) The 3rd edition is about $50 - probably less on Amazon.com! For a bit less cash there is also a great abbreviated version of this book called "Pocket Guide to Japanese Maples" by the same author. I know that it's available for 18-20 dollars. It is perfect for making that master wish list!

    Also check out the JM photo forum here at the UBC online. You can search for the term 'variegated' or 'full shade' - or whatever - and see what pops up. There is also an interesting thread listing everyone's 5 most favorite trees. It's neat to read what everyone says. You can get a lot of insight there too.

    HAVE FUN!
     
  7. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Hi Jocelie,

    You live in a great place to grow Japanese maples, and should get pretty reliable colour even in shade. One thing to remember though is that most maples colour less well when they aren't established. So, it should get better over time.

    I've got A. palmatum 'Beni tsukasa' growing in quite heavy shade, I am really struck by the colours this year -- and in a year without too much colour -- which are a sort of orange dusted with green and white variegation. I wish I could post a picture, but my camera has just broken. Other maples which for me show good colour in the shade are Ariadne and A. truncatum Akikaze nishiki.

    Two weeks ago I was in western Mass around 495, and really enjoyed the foliage, it made me miss the area. Especially this year when we are so colour challenged here. Gorgeous. I saw a really big palmatum atropurpureum form just starting to colour up on Rte 27 near Maynard, a very fine tree.

    About the Vertrees books, one of the great things about "Japanese Maples" that is missing from the Pocket Guide is the appendix where the type of light each maple requires is listed. I find myself turning to that all the time. Of course the Pocket Guide is much more up to date for new cultivars, a big advantage.

    -E
     
  8. Jocelie

    Jocelie Member

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    Wow, thanks for this extremely helpful (and encouraging!) reply. Today is the day we actually plant the tree. I haven't been able to stop going to the window and looking out at it all morning... I'm really excited!

    It's great to have book recommendations--and to have a first-hand recommendation about other shade-loving acer palmata--I'll investigate the books and those trees right away. (We have a tiny yard, but I know there's room for a couple more little trees--perhaps in the spring... I feel we're already on the cusp of the safe weather for planting.)

    I don't have a digital camera, but after I develop my film and have a CD made, I'll upload any decent photos of little Tamukeyama...

    By the way, does anyone know how old it would be if it's about 2.5' to 3' high?
     
  9. Jocelie

    Jocelie Member

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    Hi, there! Could someone tell me if I should or should not cover the graft union when I plant my Tamukeyama? Thank you! Jocelie
     
  10. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Hi, Jocelie,

    I you mean to cover the graf union with soil, definitely do not. Keep the soil for your tree in same level than it was in the container.

    Nelson
     
  11. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Tamuke yama is definliity high 6'/8' after 10 years,i presume your is 3 years hold; do not cover the graft !
     
  12. spookiejenkins

    spookiejenkins Active Member

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    I would guess your tree is about 3 years old or so - especially if the graft is very low. You don't want to change the soil level at planting - leave the level where it was in it's original pot (unless you can see any roots - then add a bit to cover). You can eventually change the soil level - over a very long time - by adding soil little by little and letting the tree acclimate. The reverse is also true - you can take away soil little by little if you want to expose roots for interest - like with bonsai. This is a VERY slow process however, and should take years. Initially - especially during transplanting when the tree is already stressed - you want to keep the soil at the original and proper level - just at the base of the trunk - where a line of moisture should be visible on the bark. This is an area where the tree "breathes" and if covered, is detrimental.
     
  13. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    That's it, Katie, much better explanation. I don't know, (as you know I'm a rookie growing JMs), but, Do you recommend to plant in ground this small maple? I think it's little bit young and probably the root ball is not enought developed. My experience with three Atropurpureums (with similar size than Jocelie's one), is that they didn't work in ground; so I had to dig out and now I'm growing them in containers, until they develop more size and strong roots. However, my others JMs with bigger sizes are performing pretty well in ground. It's just a comment/suggestion, so please correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  14. spookiejenkins

    spookiejenkins Active Member

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    Hey Nelson! I think your reservations are founded there in Texas. For Jocelie in Massachusetts though, maples have a MUCH easier time! Texas is very harsh for maples - poor soil, fierce sun, scorching heat, very high pH (water and soil), etc. It is by no means the ideal environment! Thats why, when in TX, I always had an easier time bringing maples through the summer when they were in pots. It's much easier to control their environment.

    Jocelie should be able to plant whenever she likes. She has the benefit of better soil, less intense sun, and much cooler temps. I couldn't really say about the pH though. :) At the moment, every single one of my maples is in a pot, but here in VA, I know I could plant a first year graft in the yard and it would be fine (as long as I monitored the water of course). I would NEVER try that in Texas!!
     
  15. Jocelie

    Jocelie Member

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    Thanks, again, everyone. My tree didn't come in a container; the root ball was wrapped in burlap. It's my understanding that it should be planted about 2" or 3" above the ground, which would then expose the graft union (which is currently packed with clay around it). Is that right?
    Jocelie
     
  16. nelran

    nelran Active Member

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    Thanks for the explanation Katie.
     
  17. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Jocelie ... they are better planted high anyways for drainage purposes, and, yes, I would not cover the graft. I am surprised that it is currently packed with clay around it anyway..........
     
  18. Jocelie

    Jocelie Member

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    Thanks, Whis4ey! I've removed the clay, replanted the tree (higher), and now the very slender graft is above ground--I see that just an inch below it is a large lateral root, which I've kept covered.

    Jocelie
     
  19. Jocelie

    Jocelie Member

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    Dave planting our Tamukeyama!

    Jocelie
     

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  20. alex66

    alex66 Rising Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Ahh !!compliments maple have good look ....
     
  21. whis4ey

    whis4ey Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    A fine looking tree
    I hope it does well for you
     
  22. emery

    emery Renowned Contributor Maple Society 10 Years

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    Forget about the tree, look at that great planting hole! :) The earth looks really nice. Friable and free draining. I predict it will like its new home.

    I'd be interested in getting a close up look at some of the bark. Looks to me like the tree has seen a fair amount of sun, perhaps some wind, but hard to tell from the picture.
     
  23. Jocelie

    Jocelie Member

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    Thank you all for your messages! I feel like I've fallen into a whole world of kindred souls... It's wonderful.

    I'll try to get some close-ups of the bark. The tree's bark was a lighter color than any of the barks on the other Tamukeyamas at this nursery--and this was the only T. on sale, so I kind of wondered about it...

    My camera is NOT digital, so after I finish the role I'm on, I'll have a CD made and send on some pics of the bark. Thanks!

    Jocelie
     

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