Public Recall of Camellias in BC

Discussion in 'Conversations Forum' started by Daniel Mosquin, Jun 11, 2004.

  1. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  2. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    If you want to go through a free-for-seven-days registration, an editorial entitled "Felled by Fungus" is available on the New Scientist web site here:
    Felled by Fungus

    The editorial blends the story of Phytophthora and the mass distribution of exotic plants by nurseries, suggesting a change in propagation and distribution practices is required to prevent further outbreaks of this and other diseases.
     
  3. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    the issue this Spring caused many headahces in the local area. Better techniques are needed for a few tasks. Better exchange of info is needed too although I feel this issue was handled swiftly and effectively by the BCLNA, BCMAAF and CFIA. We all got stuck in a big "what the heck do we do" fest and it seems like we got through so I say kudos to those who helped battle the issue and chastise those who tried to battle it.
     
  4. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    It does seem to have been dealt with reasonably well. When you say "those who tried to battle it", do you mean there were organizations that tried to deny there was a problem, or actively worked against the recall? I'm just curious.
     
  5. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    rumors were that a few garden centers were not following the requested quarantine procedures completely. Ill informed staff below management level did, and still does in my opinion abound. I have been in garden centers and have overheard conversations between employees and consumers, absolutely dreadful information is being passed along by those who I am sure have no ill intent, they just don't know any better. I also would like to mention that the BCLNA has canvassed its membership to donate funds to help pay the costs of dealing with this issue, there are a number of very large companies that are not members of the BCLNA that have gotten a free ride through this disaster, they too should consider a reasonable donation towards the cause. If you purchased a Camellia between now and last September you should call CFIA and ask them if you need to be conscerned about the possiblity of it being infected with P. ramorum (AKA Sudden Oak Death or SOD).
     
  6. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    Of interest to note is the difference between the CFIA and the USDA in approach to this threat.

    The CFIA includes all species of the various genera, whereas the USDA (APHIS) is species specific, with the exception of genus Rhododendron and genus Camellia.

    Aphis reports 140 confirmed cases in 19 states as of July 2, 2004 with the most recent case in Nassau County, NY.
     
  7. Daniel Mosquin

    Daniel Mosquin Paragon of Plants UBC Botanical Garden Forums Administrator Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I see that the most recent case was from a mature oak tree in a park. That doesn't seem to bode well.
     
  8. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    In addition, I received a private communication from a USDA agent that P. ramorum has been found on a non-host plant in one of the eastern states.
    This is in the process of being confirmed by an independent investigator.

    We may be able to slow down the progress, I doubt we can stop it.
    The attached images are of P. ramorum on Rhododendron 'Vulcan', discovered in a plant nursery in the Greater Vancouver area, June, 2003.
    Photos by Shane Sela, Forestry Specialist, Plant Products Program Network, Western Area, CFIA
     

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  9. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    Paul, what do you know about this certification program?

    Chris
     
  10. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Chris. Last I heard (BCLNA Landscape Commoditymeeting, last week) was that the system will be up and down stream for certification. In order for a nursery to be certified SOD clear the nurseries they bring in material (I think host material only) will need to be certified and thusly any nursery that they ship to will require that the nursery is SOD certified in order to retain their certification. Random and regular testing will be carried out by a team of trained inspectors (I think on the BCLNA but it may be CFIA tab). Testing will be regular and timely (certain number of tests per annum). The nurseries will be held to a best management practices regime (once it itself is finalized) things like boot wash on entry, limited entry, cleanliness of proppogation and growing materials, material handling, plant placement in the nursery (spacial differences and perhaps buffer zones to lower contamination between species and hosts). I dont know how much of it is concrete as yet but they are working very hard on this to keep the doors open to export and to try to limit the spread. But, I am also afraid that there may be little we can do but satisfy the rule makers that we are trying our best. For best info Hedy Dick at the BCLNA office is who you want to talk to . You posted some pictures from Shane, does he not have the program info to offer? I saw him at the beginning of this issue at the first few grower meetings and he was getting slammed from all sides. Must have a thick skin!
     
  11. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  12. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    An authority on Phytophthora I know said some time ago that quarantines won't work for this now.
     
  13. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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  14. Chris Klapwijk

    Chris Klapwijk Active Member 10 Years

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    I've posted the BCLNA SOD certification update here, see the November 17, 2004 entry.
     
  15. mr.shep

    mr.shep Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    An authority on Phytophthora I know said some time
    ago that quarantines won't work for this now.


    I believe this is quite true. We saw indications of a
    blast form of Phytophthora back in the late 80's in
    Oregon that caused some severe destruction to some
    Rhododendron and Azalea growers. I know this is
    not what anyone will want to read but the symptoms
    as shown on the Vulcan are not anything new. We
    saw that kind of stuff in Oregon starting around 1987
    in some Coastal areas. The pathogen was determined
    to be a form of Phytophthora other than ramorum. The
    area of concern for me at present based on reports I am
    seeing coming out of various US, predominately West
    Coast Universities, is that currently all studies are basing
    all their findings on SOD as being ramorum which may
    be accurate and it may not be so accurate.

    It makes sense to develop and utilize a certification
    program for plants in British Columbia nurseries but
    it may also require that those same nurseries cannot
    bring in new plant material into their nurseries for a
    very long time as well, in order to remain certified.
    As one that has been directly involved with insect
    caused quarantines let me point out that for Agriculture
    here in California that once a County has been placed
    under quarantine, no Agricultural products can go out
    of the County and none can come in either. We become
    isolated is how it used to work. With the "Med Fly"
    crisis the State Department of Agriculture amended
    things to let Agricultural commodities stay within the
    State of California but no known plant carriers of that
    insect could come into our State until we had a handle
    on where did the Med Fly come in from and how infested
    had we become in the areas where the insects were found
    by use of pheromone traps.

    It is too late to enact a quarantine as no one really knows
    how long you or we've been infested with this pathogen.
    All we can do is try to prevent its spread and to do that we
    have to be vigilant in how we carry out our preventative
    measures.

    Jim

    I am not at liberty to discuss the SOD issue any further
    at this time. Sorry about that.
     

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