Round-Up and cutting plants

Discussion in 'HortForum' started by Mike of Capra Vista, Apr 4, 2024.

  1. Mike of Capra Vista

    Mike of Capra Vista New Member

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    How long after spraying Round-Up on a plant before I can cut the plant off and still have the roots die?

    I sprayed some shrubs I wish to be gone. They easily come back from bits of root in the ground. It will take a long time before the plants look dead, but I would like to have them gone now. Will the plants have absorbed enough Round-Up to kill them in 4 or 5 days so that I can cut off the tops now? Or do I have to wait till the plants look dead?
     
  2. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Dig them up.
     
  3. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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    If digging them up is a problem, another way for Roundup (glyphosate) to be effective is to cut the shrub down to within 2 or 3 inches of the ground and paint concentrated Roundup on the freshly-cut trunk. If it begins to regrow, you can cut again a little below the original cut and reapply. This is the only effective way I know to eliminate shrubs like established Scot's Broom (Cytisus scoparius) and Spurge Laurel (Daphne laureola) which are next-to-impossible to dig up especially if there a big rocks in the ground.
     
  4. Mike of Capra Vista

    Mike of Capra Vista New Member

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    Thanks Margot.
    Is painting the fresh cut more effective than spraying the whole plant and cutting it off 3 or 4 days later?
     
  5. Margot

    Margot Renowned Contributor 10 Years

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    I don't know if any research has been done to compare methods of application. Perhaps a better word would be 'efficient'. From a subjective point of view, I would rather use less product in a controlled way.
    Spraying something as large as a shrub risks damaging other, desirable, plants and the possibility of the applicator breathing in the mist.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    A used and cleaned out plastic bleach bottle can be modified to become a spray drift barrier when attached to a pump sprayer nozzle.
     

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