SFU's take on Round Up

Discussion in 'Conversations Forum' started by jimweed, May 30, 2006.

  1. jimweed

    jimweed Active Member 10 Years

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    I recived this email the other day via CC from SFU, from faculty in bio-sciences:
    Customer had question on how toxic round up is considered to be on human health, just thought I would share this with anyone else with the same question, and this is what they had to say,

    Glyphosate (Round-up, or Vision in forestry),
    >N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine, is the most widely used herbicide in
    >North America. It consists of the amino acid glycine with a
    >phosphate group attached. This amino acid is found free and as a
    >component of peptides and proteins in humans and other animals, as
    >well as in plants. Phosphate groups are also very common in all
    >living organisms. Although glyphosate itself is not found in
    >organisms, there is no reason to expect that it would be toxic or
    >carcinogenic. It's mode of action is specific to plants, in that it
    >inhibits the shikkimic acid pathway, by which plants make defensive
    >compounds. Thus treated plants commonly die from infections of
    >naturally-occurring microorganisms. With an oral LD-50 of over
    >4,000 mg per kg, it is less toxic than aspirin. It is not
    >carcinogenic. There are no reported cases of any long-term health
    >effects in humans. In the environment, it binds very quickly to
    >soil particles and is thus inactivated. It then breaks down by
    >microbial action, acting as a mild fertilizer by releasing both
    >phosphorus and nitrogen. Overall, glyphosate is completely safe,
    >much safer than most household chemicals, such as bleach, after
    >shave lotion, toilet cleaner, Tylenol or even table salt. But don't
    >get it on your favourite plants.
     
  2. L.plant

    L.plant Active Member

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  3. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    hmm, I think we've heard that many times before !
     
  4. jimmyq

    jimmyq Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    dont worry, some weeds are beginning to resist it, soon it may not even be toxic to plants!

    ps. LD50 charts dont take in to account long term exposure, just acute dose.
    All in all I feel that roudnup is fairly low toxicity but hey, lets still be careful out there.
     
  5. bcgift52

    bcgift52 Active Member

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    I tried it last year on some bindweed growing up our back fence - it killed those patches but this year they're back with a vengeance everywhere else.
     
  6. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Then there is the problem of 'inert ingredients' that are anything but inert found in pesticides sampled by officials.
     
  7. NiftyNiall

    NiftyNiall Active Member 10 Years

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    I was surprised that something from SFU, would even mention MLD,(Minimum Lethal Dose)/50(%). This have been proven to mean very little in the scheme of things. Some organisms,(including us) will be found to be hypersensitive, and a very low dose will have disastrous consequences. MLD/50, when used, also usually mentions the animal used for testing,i.e.,dogs,rats,etc...(generally not US).

    The Department of Fisheries & Oceans,(DFO), recently has allowed it to be used within 1M., of water with a special permit,(injection,spot application.) Glyphosphate reacts much differently in water, than in soil solutions.

    The so called inert ingredients, risks are rarely even mentioned. Be carefull using any product, even vinegar and detergents have risks.
     

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