Soil PH for various plants

Discussion in 'Soils, Fertilizers and Composting' started by navaf, Aug 30, 2006.

  1. navaf

    navaf Member

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    I am particularly interested in finding the soil PH levels for flowering plants such as the Korean lilac, Burning Bush and roses. Thank you
     
  2. Mr.pH

    Mr.pH Member

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    AFAIK roses like soil with pH about 6.5
     
  3. navaf

    navaf Member

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    Thank you. I'm mainly interested in the ph requirement for lilacs and more importantly the Korean Lilac.
     
  4. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    Lilacs generally do best with fairly high pH (7-8).

    What do you mean by 'Burning Bush'? That can mean several different plants (or a political statement!)
     
  5. navaf

    navaf Member

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    Sorry I don't know the technical name. The bush I have has dark green leaves during the summer which turn bright red in the fall.

    Thank you for the information on the lilac's ph. My soil is about where you said it should be. Some of the leaves have dark spots and are curling up and turning a grayish brown. It can't be lack of water since we have had above normal rainfall this summer. I just planted 3 of these lilacs this year and I hope I'm not going to lose them.
     
  6. Newt

    Newt Well-Known Member 10 Years

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    Hi Navaf,

    I think your burning bush is Euonymus alata aka Euonymus alatus aka winged Euonymus.
    http://home.howstuffworks.com/define-burning-bush.htm
    http://www.hcs.ohio-state.edu/hcs/TMI/Plantlist/eu_alata.html
    http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/alert/alrteuon.html
    http://www.invasive.org/eastern/srs/WBB.html

    They like good drainage so I suspect you have some type of leaf spot from the rain. Clean up all fallen leaves as often as you can and don't leave any on the ground over the winter. Provide good drainage. Here's a picture of the coral spot nectria canker on the bark mentioned in the second link above.
    http://johab.nong21.co.kr/bh/pic/cd06_bb.jpg

    Winged Euonymus scale can also be a pest, but the leaves tend to turn yellow. Take a look at pg. 10 here.
    http://www.mortonarboretumphc.org/PHC report pdfs/050605 Issue 3.pdf#search="Winged Euonymus scale"

    It can tolerate a wide range of pH.
    http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cach...+Euonymus+alata+++pH&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=3

    You might find this helpful in determining the pH levels plants prefer.
    http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/components/1731-29.html
    http://msucares.com/pubs/infosheets/is0372.pdf
    http://www.humeseeds.com/soilph.htm
    http://www.gardenguides.com/TipsandTechniques/ph.htm
    http://www.ranchomondo.com/compost/phfactor.htm

    Newt
     

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