Why did my bark crack?

Discussion in 'Maples' started by Brockstar, Sep 19, 2016.

Tags:
  1. Brockstar

    Brockstar Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    I have several large maples that I planted three years ago. I water them a couple of times a week and support with tree gator bags. I noticed that this summer, the bark split and cracked and seems to shed off in chunks. Can anyone tell me why this happens and what I could do to prevent it in other trees? I'm in the mid Cowichan Valley on Vancouver Island.

    Thanks very much.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Brockstar

    Brockstar Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    After doing some more research last night, I think it is likely sunscald. Can anyone confirm?
     
  3. Sundrop

    Sundrop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,057
    Likes Received:
    98
    Location:
    Kootenays, BC, Canada
    If it is sunscald I wonder why you didn't notice it much earlier, in spring?
    For sunscald to develop you need very cold, below freezing temperatures at night followed by very sunny, warm weather during the day. Did you have that kind of weather in winter in Cowichan Valley? Is the damage only on the S-W facing side of your trees?

    Sorry to say this, but regardless of what is the cause of the injury, in my opinion the tree on the picture has a little, if any, chance of survival.
    In the future, if you planted a new one forget about treegator bags and water twice a week with a spot sprinkler only in the first year after planting. Next year deep watering once a week during summer will be sufficient, after that, in subsequent years water only in case of prolonged drought. And don't over fertilize, either.
     
  4. AlainK

    AlainK Renowned Contributor Forums Moderator Maple Society 10 Years

    Messages:
    3,076
    Likes Received:
    3,966
    Location:
    nr Orléans, France (E.U.)
    Sunscald perhaps, but as soon as the bark is gone, fungus and diseases are prone to invade the tree. I'm afraid this tree is a goner.

    I also think that "treegator" and such devices are among the best ways to kill a tree, IMO.
     
  5. Brockstar

    Brockstar Member

    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    Thank you for your responses. I think I will just wait it out and see how the tree does. What other option do I really have?

    As for the anti-tree gator bag comments, what evidence would lead you to those conclusions? They are well used in the valley to sustain us through our summer drought periods and I have never heard any negative comments about them before...
     
  6. Margot

    Margot Generous Contributor 10 Years

    Messages:
    2,348
    Likes Received:
    1,226
    Location:
    Nanoose Bay, BC Canada
    There is an interesting discussion about the advantages and disadvantages of treegator bags on houzz . . . treegators? Any good?
     

Share This Page