Wondering the name of the tree? Berries is edible?

Discussion in 'Plants: Identification' started by ptjmliao, Sep 24, 2022.

  1. ptjmliao

    ptjmliao Member

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    Hey there,

    Wondering the name of the berry like tree?
    Berries are edible?

    thanks
     

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  2. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Looks like Cornus mas.....common name Cornelian cherry.
    Others will confirm, I hope
     
  3. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I'd agree with Cornus mas, though somewhat surprised to see it planted in Vancouver (it is hardly ever planted here in Britain, despite being far closer to its native range!). Yes, the fruit is edible, though I've never had the opportunity to try it myself. From what I've read, it is more used for making jam than eaten fresh, so I guess it might not be too palatable when raw. Try one and see - it won't hurt!
     
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  4. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Not particularly unfamiliar immediately to the south of coastal British Columbia in western Washington nurseries and plantings; the Center for Urban Horticulture (CUH in the second search result below) in Seattle has over twenty of them grouped together near the involved arterial where they attract interest at fruiting time, when the lawn beneath may become carpeted by the "cherries".

    At my previous habitation there was a long-established one directly across the street. Another property minutes away had an espaliered example that was 33 ft. tall when measured some years ago.

    Search: 5 results found for "cornus* mas*" — Raintree Nursery

    Living Collection Search | University of Washington Botanic Gardens

    37 participating vendor listings for the typical species plus a number of different named selections being listed as having at least one current source here and there in the search result:

    RHS advice & tips on garden & indoor plants | Plant finder & selector / RHS Gardening
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2022
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  5. wcutler

    wcutler Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator VCBF Cherry Scout 10 Years

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    They're in parks and botanical gardens around Vancouver. My friends in the suburb just south of here had some fruits from them last week, not sure where they found them.
     
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  6. ptjmliao

    ptjmliao Member

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    Thanks for all replies. I found them nearby the UBC. The cherries tasted a bit sour however nice treats for birds.
     
  7. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  8. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Native of Europe, cultivated for centuries in Britain. Before the introduction of the Japanese witch hazels the Cornelian cherry was the most effective of yellow-flowering shrubs in bloom as early as February. It is still one of the most valuable we have

    Cornus mas - Trees and Shrubs Online
     
  9. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    I know! But that still doesn't explain why you very rarely ever come across specimens of it. I've not seen a single one anywhere outside of 'professional' places like RBG Edinburgh.
     
  10. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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  11. Silver surfer

    Silver surfer Generous Contributor 10 Years

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    Agree it is not very common.
    I grew it in my old garden.
    Love the flowers and berries
    CORNUS  MAS 21-08-2009 16-37-01.JPG CORNUS  MAS 11-03-2010 14-41-29.JPG CORNUS  MAS 11-03-2010 14-40-37.JPG CORNUS  MAS 02-09-2008 12-12-11.JPG CORNUS  MAS  11-03-2010 14-40-58.JPG

    Also grew Cornus mas variegata.
    CORNUS  MAS  VARIEGATA 22-09-2007 12-22-12.JPG
     
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  12. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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  13. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    Proves my point

    Your original claim was that it is hardly ever planted here in Britain. The Atlas - which has a main subject area of spontaneous occurrences in Britain and Ireland - after mentioning British cultivation history reports in the same sentence that the plant is popular in gardens. Followed by a mention of first known wild occurrence - clearly popular in gardens in this context = British gardens.

    Otherwise, being in a comparatively similar climate area I have been reading British gardening books, magazines (and later web sites) for over 50 years. I have also been there in person. And cultivation of wild plants does not radiate symmetrically so that the farther from natural distribution areas gardens are located the fewer of a given plant will be seen - look at all the Sino-Himalayan plants that continue to be introduced to western cultivation by westerners bringing them back to Britain and vicinity, North America directly from Asian collection sites many thousands of miles away.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2022
  14. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    So, on your visits to Britain, you can attest that you saw tens to hundreds (or more) of specimens of Cornus mas, every day? If you can't, then clearly, the citation as 'popular in [UK] gardens' is wrong, or at least very out-of-date (maybe it was popular a century or more ago, but if so, the overwhelming majority have died or been removed). I stand by my original claim that is it hardly ever planted in Britain.
     
  15. Ron B

    Ron B Paragon of Plants 10 Years

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    tens to hundreds (or more) of specimens of Cornus mas every day

    There's a considerable difference between hardly ever and ubiquitous.
     
  16. Michael F

    Michael F Paragon of Plants Forums Moderator 10 Years

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    But not much difference between 'popular' and ubiquitous - to be popular, I'd think it'd be in at least 10% of gardens, which means in a day's travel, you'd see tens to hundreds (e.g. something like Syringa vulgaris, for a similarly-sized plant). And while you haven't confirmed whether you did or didn't, I certainly haven't. The fact that there's zero specimens recorded in multiple major cities strongly indicates against 'popular'.
     
  17. pmurphy

    pmurphy Contributor

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    The fruit is very similar in taste to a cherry, sweet with a little tartness when fully ripe....delicious on its own and makes a great jam. Only drawback is you need lots to make jam as they contain a very large seed.
    They also make a great specimen plant because they flower in late winter/early spring.

    FYI, I have 2 of these and they were not easy to find (got one at Gardenworks and the other for $5 on clearance at Art Knapps (Port Coquitlam, this location is now gone)

    IMG_6007.JPG IMG_6009.JPG
     
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